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Harvard Collège 
Library 



MOLIÈRE COLLECTION 

raOll THS ORT OF 

HORACE BAXTER STANTON 

Cl«Mofl900 
OF BOSTON 

For books to be added to the collection 
of Professor Ferdinand B^ber 




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Molière^s Plays 

Translated by Curtis Hidden Pagm 



Les Femmes Savantes 

(The Leamed Ladiet) 

Tartuffe 

(The Hypocrite) 

Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme 

(The Tradesman Turaed Gentlemen) 

Les Précieuses Ridicules 

(The Affeeted Misses) 

Le Médecin malgré Lui 

(The Doetor by Compulsion) 



G. P. Putnam's Sons, Publishers 



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Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme 

(The Tradesman Tumed Gentleman) 



Molière 

Tnmsltted by 

Gurtis Hidden Page 

Late ProfeaM»r of the Romance Languaget and Literatorct in Columbia Univertitjr 



G. P. Putnam's Sons 

New York and London 

TCbe fmicftetbocftet |>te00 

1912 



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Va<,i n^.^s- 




/nK-^t^c^ ^^ .^pfc.4^t3^ 



COPVKIGHT, 1908 
BV 

G. P. PUTNAM'S SONS 



«be mmcfcetftocker pttm, «ew ffarft 



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LE 
BOURGEOIS GENTILHOMME 

COMEDIE-BALLET EN CINQ ACTES 
14 OCTOBRE, 1670 



THE TRADESMAN TURNED GEN- 
TLEMAN 

A COMEDY-BALLET IN FIVE ACTS 
OCTOBER 14, 1670 
(The original is in prose y with lyric interludes) 



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INTRODUCTORY NOTE 

The Tradesman tumed Gentleman is perhaps the best 
of the many court entertainments, uniting music, dancing, 
and comedy, which Molière fumished for the diversion 
of King Louis. For his contemporaries, the chief interest 
of it was in the interludes of song and dance, and especi- 
ally in the '^Turkish ceremony '' which the king himself 
had asked Molière to provide for. The royal treasury 
expended on the arrangements, including music, costumes, 
the two visits of Molière's troupe to the court, etc., no less 
than 49,404 francs and 18 sous — counted with Mr. Jour- 
dain's own exactness— which was an exceeding large 
sum for those days. 

For us, however, the chief interest of the play lies in 
îts character s and its humour, in the way in which Molière 
has af ter ail let the , dramaticelem^ enLiiominate the resf, 
the skill with which he has made, the interludes seem an 
almost necessary part of the action, the <^''"»^ »^ ^^'fr_^ ith 
which he has kept within the bounds aî possi bilitv thoug h 
hi s subîect seemed to lead inevitably to extravagant f arce^ 
and has given us, once for ail, t he etemal human comedv 
of the snob > Farcical and almost impossible as the last 
part of the play may seem, it was to receive an odd jus- 
tification in real life sixteen years after it was produced, 
in the case of the Abbé de Saint- Martin, a worthy citizen 
and gênerons benef actor of his native city of Caen, who was 
led to believe that the king of Siam, having read and ad- 
mired his works, had made him a Mandarin and Marquis 
of Mispou in New France ; and, after having been installed 
in his new dignities ,by a company of University students 
in disguîse, with cérémonies lasting for two days and 
stranger than any imagined by Molière, he never suspected 
l\ie genuineness of thèse titles, and signed them with 
\ils name, to the end of his life. 



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characters actors 

/ Mr. Jourdain Molière 

' Mrs. Jourdain, his wife,^« Hubert 

r LuciLE, his daughter . . . . .- Mlle. Molière 

C ^LEONTE, suitor of Lucile 

/ DoRiMENE, a marquise Mlle. Debrie 

vJDorante, a count, in love with Dorimène..LA Grange 

' -Nicole, servant to Mr. Jourdain Mlle. Beauval 

*>~Co vielle, valet to Cléonte Du Croisy 

""A Music-Master Hubert 

His Scholar , Gaye 

—A Dancing-M ASTER La Thorilliere 

-A Fencing-Master .Debrie 

-A Philosophy-Master Du Croisy 

v^ Master Tailor. 

A JOURNEYMAN TaILOR BEAUVAL 

-Two Lackeys 
Musicians, Dancers, Çooks, Joumeymen Taîlors, and 
other characters to dance in the interludes 

The scène is at Paris 



c 



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THE TRADESMAN TURNED GEN- 
TLEMAN 

A MUSICAL COMEDY 



ACT I 

OverturCy pîayed by a full orchestras in the middle of 
the stage the Music-Master^ s Scholar^ seated at a table^ is 
composing the air for a sérénade which Mr. Jourdain has 
ordered. 

SCENE I 

Music-MASTERy Dancing-Master, Three Singers, 
Two ViOLiNisTS, Four Dangers 

-^MUSIC-MASTER, to the singers 
Hère, step inside, and waît untîl he cornes. 

DANCING-MASTER, to the dancers 
And you toc, thîs way, 

music-master, to his scholar 
Is it finîshed? 

scholar 
Yes. 



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6 Molière 

MUSIC-MASTER 
Let *s see • . . That 's good, 

DANCING-MASTER 

Is it something new? 

MUSIC-MASTER 
Yes, 't îs the aîr for a sérénade which I hâve had 
him compose^ while waiting for our gentleman to 
wake up. 

DANCING-MASTER 

May I see ît? 

MUSIC-MASTER 
You shall héar ît, with the words, when he cornes. 
He won't be long. 

DANCING-MASTER 

You and I hâve no lack of occupation now. 

MUSIC-MASTER 
That *s true. ' We hâve found a man hère who îs 
just what we both needed. He 's a nîce little source 
of income for us, thîs Mr. Jourdain, with hîs visions 
of nobility and gallantry that he has got înto his j 
noddle. And *t would be a fine thing for your capers 
and my crotchets îf everybody were like him, 

DANCING-MASTER 
No, no, not quite ; I could wish, for hîs sake, that 
he had some true understandîng of the good thîngs 
we brîng him. 

MUSIC-MASTER 

T is true he understands them ill, but he 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 7 

pays them well; and that is what the arts need 
most nowa davs. 

' DANCING-MASTER 

For my part, l 'U own, I must be fed somewhat on 
famé. I am sensitive to applause, and I feel that in 
ail the fine arts *t îs a grievous torture to show one's 
talents before fools, and to endure the barbarous 
judgments of a dunce upon our compositions. There 's 
great pleasure» I tell you, in working for people 
who are capable of feeling the refinements of art, 
who know how to give a flattering réception to the 
beauties of your work, and recompense your toîl by 
titillating praise. Yes, the iliost agreeable reward 
possible for what we do, is to see it understood, to 
see it caressed by applause that honours us. Nothing 
else, methinks, can pay us so well for ail our labours; 
and enlightened praise gives exquisite delight. 

MUSIC-MASTER 
I grant you that, and I relish it as you do. There 
is surely nothing more gratifyingthan such praise as 
you speak of ; but man cannot live on incense. Mère 
praise won't bu y you an estate ; it tak'es something 
more solid. And the best way to praise, is to praise 
with open hands. Our fellow, to be sure, is a man of 
little wit, who discourses at random about anything 
and everything, and never applauds but at the wrong 
time. But his money sets right the errors of hîs 
mind ; there is judgment in his purse ; hîs praises pass 
current; and this ignorant shopkeeper is worth more 
to us, as you very well see, than the enlightened lord 
who introduced us to his house. 



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8 Molière 

DANCING-MASTER 
There îs some tnith în what you say ; but methinks 
you set too much store by money ; and self-înterest 
is something so base, that no gentleman should ever 
show a leaning towards it. 

MUSIC-MASTER 

Yet I hâve n't seen you refuse the money our fel- 
low offers you. 

DANCING-MASTER 

Certaînly not ; but neîther do I find thereîn ail my 
happiness ; and I could still wish that with his wealth 
he had good taste to boot. 

MUSIC-MASTER 

I could wish so too ; and 't is to that end that we 
are both working, as best we may. But in any case, 
he gîves us the means to make ourselves known in 
the world ; he shall pay for others, and others shall 
praîse for him. 

DANCING-MASTER 

Hère he cornes. 

SCENE II 

Mr. Jourdain, in dressing-gown and night-cap j Music- 
Master, Dancing-Master, Dancing-Master's 

SCHOLAR, SiNGERS, DANGERS, LaCKEYS 
MR. JOURDAIN 

Well, gentlemen ? How îs ît ? Are you going to 
3how me your waggîsh trifle ? 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 9 

DANCING-MASTER 

How ? What waggish trîfle ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Why! Youknow . . • what d* ye call the thîng ? 
Your prologue, or your dialogue în song and dance. 

DANCING-MASTER 

Oh! oh! 

MUSIC-MASTER 

You find us ready. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

I have kept you waîtîng a little, but 't îs because I 
am to be dressed tç-day lîke people of quality, and 
my tailor sent me some silk stockings that I thought 
I should never get on. 

MUSIC-MASTER 

We are hère only to waît upon your leisure. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
I beg you both not to go tîll they have brought 
my clothes, so that you can see me în them. 

DANCING-MASTER 
Whatever you will. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

You shall see me properly rîgged out, from head 
to foot. 

MUSIC-MASTER 
We don't doubt ît. 



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lo Molière 

MR. JOURDAIN 

I have had this Indian gown made for me. 

DANCING-MASTER 

*T îs very handsome. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

My tailor tells me that people of quality appear 
thus in the morning. 

MUSICMASTER 

It becomes you marvellously. 

MR. JOURDAIN^ 

Lackeys ! Ho, both my lackeys ! 

FIRST LACKEY 

Your pleasure, sîr? 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Nothing. 'T was only to see whether you are at- 
tendîng. {Ta the music-master and dancing-master) 
What do you say to my liveries ? 

DANCING-MASTER 

They are magnificent. 

MR. JOURDAIN, openitig his gown and showing his 
close-fitting red velvet breeches^ and a green 
velvetjacket 
Thîs îs a négligée costume to take my exercise in, 
in the morning. 

MUSIOMASTER 
*T îs very genteel. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman n 

MR. JOURDAIN 



Lackey ! 
Sir. 



FIRST LACKEY 



MR. JOURDAIN 



T' other lackey ! 

SECOND LACKEY 

Sîr. 

MR. JOURDAIN, taking off his dressing-gawn 
Hold my gown. {To the music-master and dancing- 
master) Do y ou like me so? 

DANCING-MASTER 

Hugely. Nothing could be better. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Well, now for your affair. 

MUSIC-MASTER 

I should like first to hâve you hear an air whîch he 

{pointing to his scholar) has just composed for the 

sérénade you requested. He îs one of my scholars, 

and he has an admirable talent for that sort of thing. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Yes. But you had no business to get ît done by 
a scholar. You were none too good for the job 
yourself. 

MUSIC-MASTER 

Sir, the word scholar must not mîslead you. Such 



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M Molière 

scholars know as much as the greatest master ; and 
the air is as beautiful as anything could possibly be. 
Only lîsten to ît, 

MR. JOURDAIN, to his lockeys 
Gîve me my gown, to hear better. . . . Wait, 
't will be better wîthout the gown. No, gîve ît back 
to me ; that is the best way. 

A SINGER 
/ languish nigkt andday^ and know no end 

Ofpainy since l've been slave to your fait eyes. 
Ifthus^ my love y y ou use a loving friend^ 

A las/ what fate befallsyour enemies ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

This song seems rather doleful to me ; 't is enough 
to put anybody to sleep, and I wish you could liven 
it up a bit hère and there. 

MUSIC-MASTER 

The air, sir, must be suited to the words. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

I learned one that was really pretty, a lîttle while 
ago. Wait . . . er • • • how does it go ? 

DANCING-MASTER 
On my Word, I don't know. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

There 's lamb in it. 

DANCING-MASTER 

Lamb? 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 13 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Yes. Ah ! {He sings .•) 

/ thought tny fait Jenny 
As gentle as any ; 
I thought tny fait Jenny 
As mild as a lamby. 
Butalas! butalas! 
She 's more cruel by far^ she *s more cruel by far^ 
Than the wild tigers are. 

Isn't ît pretty? 

MUSIC-MASTER 
Nothing could be prettier, 

DANCING-MASTER 

And you sîng ît well. 

MR, JOURDAIN 

Yet l 've never leamt music neîther. 

MUSIC-MASTER 
You ought to leam ît, sîr, as you do dancing. 
Thèse two arts are intîmately bound together. 

DANCING-MASTER 

And they open a man's eyes to the beauty of 
thîngs. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Do people of quality leam musîc too ? 

MUSIC-MASTER 

Yes, sîr. 



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14 Molière 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Then I wîll leam ît. But I don't know where I 
can find the tîme ; for, besides my fencing-master, I 
hâve also hired a philosophy-master, who is to begin 
this morhing. 

MUSIC-MASTER 

Philosophy is something, to be sure ; but music 
sir, music . . • 

DANCING-MASTER 

Music and dancing • • . Music and dancing, in 
short» are ail a man needs. 

MUSIC-MASTER 

There is nothing so serviceàble to the State as 
music. 

DANCING-MASTER 

There is nothing so necessary to mankind as 
dancing. 

MUSIC-MASTER 
Without music no State can survive. 

DANCING-MASTER 

Without dancing a man can achieve nothing. 

MUSIC-MASTER 
AU disorders, ail wars that are seen în the world, 
corne about merely for lack of knowing music. 

DANCING-MASTER 
Ail the ills of mankind, ail the tragîc mîsfortunes 
that fill the historiés, ail political blunders, ail the 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 15 

failures of great commanders, hâve corne merely 
from lack of skill in dancing. 

MR."" JOURDAIN 

Howso? 

MUSIOMASTER 

Does not war corne from want of unison among 
men? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

That îs true. 

MUSIOMASTER 

If ail men learned music, would n*t that be the 
means of bringing them into harmony, and so of 
obtaining universal peace on earth ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

You are right. 

DANCING-MASTER 

When a man has been guilty of a mistake, either 
in governing his^own affairs, or in guiding those of 
the State, or in commanding an army, do we not 
always say : Such a one has made a false step in this 
affair? 

MB. JOURDAIN 
Ycs, that is what we say. 

DANCING-MASTER 

And can making a false step resuit from anythîng 
but lack of skill in dancing? 



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i6 Molière 

MR. JOURDAIN 
That îs true. You are both right. 

DANCING-MASTER 

Thîs should show you the excellence and profita- 
bleness of dancing and music. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Yes, now I understand it. 

MUSIC-MASTER 

Will you see our two compositions ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Yes. 

MUSIC-MASTER 

As I have told you, 't is a slight attempt I made 
some time ago upon the différent passions music is 
capable of expressing. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Very good. 

MUSIC-MASTER, to the mustctans 
Hère, come forward. {To Mr. Jourdain) You are 
to imagine that they are dressed as shepherds. 

MR, JOURDAIN 

Why always shepherds ? You never see an)rthîng 
else, anywhere, 

DANCING-MASTER 

When people are to speak în music, we must, for 
verisimilitude, adopt the pastoral style. Song has 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 17 

f rom ail time been appropriated to shepherds ; and it 
is hardly natural that courtiers or townsmen should 
sing their passions in dialogue. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Well, ail right. Let *s see the thing. 

DIALOGUE IN MUSIC 

One Womân and Two Men 

WOMAN 

A heart that *s subject to love's tyran t sway, 
Wîth untold cares is tortured day by day. 

They say it is a joy to faînt and sîgh, 
But, spite of ail they say, 

There 's nothing half so sweet as liberty. 

FIRST MAN 

There 's nothing half so sweet as tender love 
That sets two hearts on fire 
With one désire ; 
There is no happiness apart from love. 
If love be gone» 
The joy of life is done. 

SECOND MAN 

It might be sweet to own the sway of love, 
If hearts would constant prove ; 
But ah ! the cruel spite ! 

No shepherdess is ever faîthful quîte; 

Thîs fickle sex, that shames the light of day, 
Will force us to abandon love for aye. 



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i8 Molière 

FIRST MAN 

O swcet désire, 

WOMAN 

o freedom dear, 

SECOND MAN 

O sex untrue, « 

FIRST MAN 

What joy dost thou înspjre! 

WOMAN 

What love to thee I bear ! 

SECOND MAN 
What hatred îs thy due ! 

FIRST MAN 

Ah ! leave thîs cruel hâte, and yîeld to love ! 

WOMAN 
And then you yet may prove 
One maid can faithful be. 

SECOND MAN 

Let me thîs marvel see ! 

WOMAN 

To prove our sex's truth, 
My heart I offer you, 

SECOND MAN 
But, shepherdess, în sooth, 
May I belîeve ît true ? 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 19 

WOMAN 

Whîch will the better love, 
Corne, let us try and see ! 

SECOND MAN 

And may the gods above 
Punish inconstancy ! 

THE THREE TOGETHER 
Ah, surely ît îs meet 

To yîeld love ail hîs due ; 
For love îs passing sweet 

If hearts be true ! 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Isthat ail? 

MUSIC-MASTER 

Yes. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Well, I think ît's very neat, and there's some 
rather pretty little maxims in it. 

DANCING-MASTER 
And now, for my contribution, hère is a little 
sample of the finest movements and most graceful 
attitudes possible in dancing. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Are they shepherds toc ? 

DANCING-MASTER 

What y ou wilL {To the dancers) Now, begin. 



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Qo Molière 

BAZZJST 
Four dancers exécute ail the différent movements and 
kinds of steps that the dancing-master bids them ; and 
this dance forms the first interlude. 



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ACT II 

SCENE I 

Mr. Jourdain, Music-Master, Dancing- M aster, 
Lackby 

MR. JOURDAIN 

That is not at ail bad, your people frisk it famously. 

MUSIC-MASTER 

When dance and music accompany each other, it 
will produce a still finer effect ; you '11 find something 
very gallant in the little ballet we hâve arranged for 
you. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
We are to hâve it this aftemoon, mind ; the person 
for whom I ordered it, is to do me the honour of 
comîng to dîne hère. 

DANCING-MASTER 
Everything is ready. 

MUSIC-MASTER 
But, sir, this is not enough ; a person like you, 
who lives magnificently and has a taste for beautiful 
things, should hâve a concert at his house every 
Wedncsday or Thursday. 



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22 Molière 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Is that what people of quality do? 

MUSIC-MASTER 

Yes,.sîr. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Then I shall. Will it be fine? 

MUSIC-MASTER 

Certaînly. You must hâve three voices, a soprano, 
a counter-tenor, and a bass, accompanied by a 
bass-viol, a theorbo, and a harpsichord for the sus- 
tained accompaniment, with two first violins for the 
variations. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

You must hâve a marine trumpet, too. The 
marine trumpet is an instrument I like, and 't is full 
of harmony. 

MUSIC-MÀSTER 
Leave ît ail to us. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Anyhow, don't forget to send me some musicians 
presently to sîng at table. 

MUSIC-MASTER 
You shall hav€ everythîng you should hâve. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

But above ail, mind you hâve a fine ballet. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 23 

MUSIC-MASTER 
You will be pleased with it, and especially with 
some minuets that you will find in it. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Ah ! the minuet is my dance, I must hâve you 
see me dance one. Corne, teacher. 

DANCING-MASTER 
A hàt, sir, please. {Mr. Jourdain takes his lackeys 
hat, and puis it on over his nightcap. The dancing- 
master takes hitn by bot h hands^ and sings the air of 
a minuet for him to dance by.) La, la, la ; la, la, la, 
la, la^ la; la, la, la; {Bis). La, la, la; la, la. Dance 
in time, will you, please, sir. La, la, la, la, la. Now 
with the right leg. La, la, la. Move your shoulders 
somewhat less, sir. La, la, la, la, la ; la, la, la, la, la. 
Both your arms are stiff as pokers. La, la, la, la, la. 
Hold your head higher. Tum out the points of 
your toes, my good sir. La, la, la. Please stand up 
straight, sir. 



MR. JOURDAIN 



Well? 



MUSIC-MASTER 

Nothing could be better. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

By the way. Teach me how to make a bow to a 
marquise. I shall need it this afternoon. 

DANCING-MASTER 

A bow to a marquise? 



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24 Molière 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Yes. A marquise whose name is Dorimène. 

DANCING-MASTER 
Gîve me your hand. 

MR, JOURDAIN 

No. You do ît ; I shall remember ît ail rîght. 

DANCING-MASTER 

If you want to bow to her wîth great respect, you 
must first draw your leg behind you and bow, then 
walk toward her» making three bows forward, and at 
the last one, bow as low as her knees. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

J ust show me. (After the dancing-master has mode 
three bows) That *11 do. 

SCENE II 

Mr. Jourdain, Music-Master, Dancing-Master» 
Lackey 

LACKEY 

Sir, hère is your fencing-master. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Tell hîm to come în and gîve me my lesson hère. 
( To the music'fnaster and dancing-master) I want you 
to see me perform. 

' SCENE III 

Mr. Jourdain, Fencing-Master, Music-Master, 
Dancing-Master, a Lackey with twofaUs 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 25 

FENCING-MASTER, takingthe twofoils front the lackey 
andgivingone ofthem to Mr. Jourdain 
Now, sir, your salute. The body erect. Theweîght 
slîghtly on the left thigh. The legs not so far apart. 
Thefeetînline. The wristînlijidwîth the thigh. The 
point of your sword in line with your shoulder. 
The arm not quite so far extended. The left hand 
on a level with the eye. The left shoulder farther 
back. Head up. A bold look. Advance. The 
body steady. Engage my sword in quart and finish 
the thnist. One, two. Recover. Again, your fect 
firm. One, two. Retreat. When you thrust, sir, 
your sword must move first, and your body be 
held well back, and sideways. One, two. Now, 
engage my sword in tierce, and finish the thrust. 
Advance. Your body steady. Advance. Now, 
from that position. One, two. Recover. Again. 
One, two. Retreat. On guard, sir, on guard 
{fhe fencing-master gives him several thrusts), on 
guard. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Well? 

MUSIC-MASTER 

You do wonders. 

FENCING-MASTER 
l 've told you already : the whole secret of arms 
consists in two things only: hitting and not being 
hit. And as I proved to you the other day by 
démonstrative logic, ît îs impossible that you should 
be hit îf you know how to tum asîde your adver- 
sary 's sword from the line of your body ; and that 



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26 Molière 

dépends merely on a slight movement of the wrist, 
inwards or outwards. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

So, then, wîthout any courage, one may be sure of 
killing his man and not being killed ? 

FENCING-MASTER 

Certainly. Did n't you see the démonstration 
ofit? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Yes. 

FENCING-MASTER 
And by thîs you may see how hîghly our pro- 
fession should be esteemed in the State ; and how 
far the science of arms excels ail other sciences, that 
are of no use, like dancing, music • . . 

DANCING-MASTER 

Softly, Mr. Swordsman ; don't speak disrespect- 
fully of dancing. 

MUSIC-MASTER 

Leam, pray, to appreciate better the excellences 
of music. 

FENCING-MASTER 

You are absurd fellows, to think of comparing 
your sciences with mine. 

MUSIC-MASTER 
Just see the man of conséquence! 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 27 

DANCING-MASTER 

The ridîculous animal» with his padded stomacher ! 

FENCING-MASTER 

My little dancing-master, I will make you dance 
to a tune of my own, and you, little songster, I will 
make you sing eut lustily. 

DANCING-MASTER 

Mr. Ironmonger, I '11 teach you your own trade. 

MR. JOURDAIN, to the dandng-master 
Are you mad, to pick a quarrel wîth hîm, when he 
knows tierce and quart, and can kill a man by 
démonstrative logic ? 

DANCING-MASTER 
A fîg for his démonstrative logic, and his tierce 
and his quart. 

MR. JOURDAIN, to the dancing-moster 
Softly, I tell you. 

FENCING-MASTER, to the dancing-moster 
What, little Master Impudence ! 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Hey ! my dcar fencing-master. 

DANCING-MASTER, to the fencing^mostet 
What, you great cart-horse I 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Hey ! my dear dancing-master. 



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28 Molière 

FENCING-MASTER 

If I once fall upon you • . . 

MR. JOURDAIN, to tke fencing-mostet 
Gently. 

DANCING-MASTER 
If I once lay hands on you . . . 

MR. JOURDAIN, to the dancing-master 
So, so. 

FENCING-MASTER 
I will give you such a dressing ... 

MR. JOURDAIN, to the feticing-master 
I beg you. 

DANCING-MASTER 
I will gîve you such a drubbing . . . 

MR. JOURDAIN, to the dancing-master 
I beseech you . . . 

V 

MUSIC-MASTER 

Let US teach hîm manners a lîttle. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Good Heavens! do stop. 

SCENE IV 

A Professor of Philosophy, Mr. Jourdain, Music- 

Master, Dancing-Master, Fencing-Master, 

Lackev 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 29 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Oho ! Mr. Philosopher, you Ve arrived in the nîck 
of time with your philosophy. Do corne and set 
thèse people hère at peace. 

THB PHILOSOPHER 

How now ? What îs the matter, gentlemen ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 
They hâve put themselves în a passion, about the 
precedence of their professions, and even insulted 
each other and almost corne to blows. 

THE PHILOSOPHER 
O fie, gentlemen ! Should a man so lose his self- 
control? Hâve you not read the learned treatise 
which Seneca composed, Of Angerf Is there any- 
thing more base or shameful than this passion, 
which of a man makes a savage beast ? Should not 
reason be mistress of ail our émotions ? 

DANCING-MASTER 

How, how, sir! Hère he comes and insults us 
both, by contemning dancing, which I practise, and 
music, which is his profession. 

THE PHILOSOPHER 
A wîse man is above ail the insults that can be 
ofiFered him ; and the chîef answer which we should 
make to ail offences, is calmness and patience. 

FENCING-MASTER 

They both hâve the insolence to think of compar- 
ing their professions with mine ! 



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30 Molière 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

Should that move you ? 'T îs not for vain glory 

and precedence that men should contend; what 

really distinguishes us from each other is wisdony 

and vîrtue. ' 

DANCING-MASTER 

I maintain to his face that dancing is a science 
which cannot be too highly honoured. 

MUSIC-MASTER 

And I» that music is a science which ail âges hâve 
reverenced. 

FENCING-MASTBR 

And I maintain, against both of them, that the 
science of f encing is the finest and most indispensable 
of ail sciences. 

THE PHILOSOPHER 
But what then becomes of philosophy ? I think 
you are ail three mighty impertinent to speak with 
such arrogance before me, and impudently to give 
the name of science to things which ought not even 
to be honoured with the name of art, and which may 
best be classed together as pitiful trades, whether of 
prize^fighters, ballad-mongers, or mountebanks. 

FENCING-MASTER 
Go to, dog of a philosopher. 

MUSIC-MASTER 
Go to, beggarly peda^gue. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 31 

DANCING-MASTER 

Go tOy past master pédant. 

THE PHILOSOPHER 
What, you rascally knaves ! . . . {He falls upon 
them^ and they ail three be labour him with blows.) 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Mr. Phaosopher! 

THE PHILOSOPHER 
Villaîns ! varlets ! insolent vermîn ! 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Mr. Philosopher ! 

FENCING-MASTER 

Plague take the beast ! 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Gentlemen ! 

THE PHILOSOPHER 
Brazen-faced ruffians ! 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Mr. Philosopher! 

DANCING-MASTER 

Deuce take the old pack-mule ! 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Gentlemen ! 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

Scoundrels ! ^ 



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32 Molière 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Mr. Philosopher! 

MUSIC-MASTER 
Devil take the impertinent puppy ! 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Gentlemen ! 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

Thîeves ! vagabonds ! rogues ! împostors f 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Mr. Philosopher ! Gentlemen ! Mr. Philosopher 1 
Gentlemen ! Mr. Philosopher ! {Exeunt fighting.) 

SCENE V 
Mr. Jourdain, Lackey 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Oh! fight as much as you please; I can't help ît, 
and I won't go spoil my gown tryîng to part you. 
I should be mad to thrust myself among them, and 
get some blow that might do me a mischief. 

SCENE VI 

The Philosopher, Mr. Jourdain, Lackey 

THE PHILOSOPHER, straightenifig his collar 
Now for our lesson. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Oh ! sir, I am sorry for the blows you got. 

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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 33 

THE PHILOSOPHER 
That 's nothing. A philosopher knows how to 
take things aright; and I shall compose a satire 
against them in Juvenal's manner, which will eut 
them up properly. But let that pass. What do you 
wanttoleam? 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Ever)rthîng I can ; for I hâve the greatest désire 
conceîvable to be learned ; it throws me in a rage to 
think that my father and mother did not make me 
study ail the sciences when I was young. 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

That is a reasonable sentiment ; fianiy sine doctrina^ 
vita est quasi ^mortis imago. You understand that, 
for of course you know Latin. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Yes;but play that I don*t know it; and explain 
what it means. 

THE PHILOSOPHER 
It means that, without learning^ life is almost an 
image of death. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

That same Latin 's in the right. 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

Have you not some foundations, some rudiments 
of knowledge ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Oh ! yes, I can read and write. 



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34 Molière 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

Where will you please to hâve us begin ? Shall I 
teach you logic ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

What may that same logic be ? 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

'T is the science that teaches the three opérations 
of the mind. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

And who are they, thèse three opérations of the 
mind? 

THE PHILOSOPHER 
The first, the second» and the third. The first is 
to conceive arîght, by means of unîversals; the 
second, to judge aright» by means of the catégories ; 
and the third, to draw déductions aright, by means 
of the figures: Barbara^ Celarent^ Darih FeriOy 
Baralipton. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
There 's a pack of crabbed words. Thîs logic 
does n*t suit me at ail. Let 's learn sonaething else 
that 's prettier. 

THE PHILOSOPHER 
Will you learn ethics? 



Ethics? 
Yes. 



MR. JOURDAIN 



THE PHILOSOPHER 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 35 

MR. JOURDAIN 

What îs your ethics about ? 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

It treats of happiness, teaches men to moderate 
their passions, and • • • 

MR. JOURDAIN 
No ; no more of that. I am cholerîc as the whole 
pack of devils, ethics or no ethics ; no, sir, I '11 be 
angry to my heart's content, whenever I hâve a mind 
toit. 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

Is it physics you want to leam ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 
And what has this physics to say for itself ? 

THE PHILOSOPHER 
Physics is the science which explains the principles 
of natural phenomena, and the properties of bodies ; 
which treats of the nature of the éléments, metals, 
minerais, stones, plants, and animais, and teaches us 
the causes of ail such things as meteors, the rainbow, 
St. Elmo's fire, comets, lightning, thunder, thunder- 
boltSy rain, snow, hail, winds, and whirlwinds. 



'/., 



MR. JOURDAIN 
There 's too much jingle-jangle in that, too much 
hurly-burly. //// 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

Then what do you want me to teach you ? 



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36 Molière 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Teach me spelling. 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

Wîth ail my heart. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

And afterwardy you shall teach me the almanac, 
so as to know when there 's a moon, and when there 
' îs n't. 

THE PHILOSOPHER 
Very well. To foUow up your Une of thought 
logically, and treat this matter in true philosophie 
fashion, we must begin, according to the proper 
order of things, by an exact knowledge of the nature 
of the letters, and the différent method of pronounc- 
ing each one. And on that head I must tell you 
that the letters are divîded into vowels, so called — 
vowels — because they express the sounds of the voice 
alone; and consonants, so called — con-sonants — be- 
cause they Sound with the vowels, and only mark 
the différent articulations of the voice. There are 
five vowels, or voices : A, E, I, O, U. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
I understand ail that. 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

The vowel A is formed by opening the mouth 
wîde : A. * 

* The vowels must of course be pronounced as in French: approxi- 
mately« A as in father, E as in they, I as in machine, O as in note; 
the Frendi U has no équivalent in English, but is like the German tt. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 37 

MR. JOURDAIN 

A, A. Ycs. 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

The vowel E îs formed by lifting the lowcr jaw 
nearer to the upper: A, E. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

A, E ; A, E. On my word, 't is so. Ah ! how fine ! 

THE PHILOSOPHER 
And the vowel I, by bringing the jaws still nearer 
together, and stretching the corners of the mouth 
toward the cars ; A, E, I. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

A, E, I, I, I, I. That is true. Science forever ! 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

The vowel O is formed by opening the jaws, and 
drawing in the lips at the corners : O. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

O, O. Nothing could be more correct : A, E, I, 
O, I, O. T is admirable 1 I, O ; I, O. 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

The opening of the mouth looks exactly like a lîttle 
circle, representing an O. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
O, O, O. You are right. O. Ah ! What a fine 
thing ît is to know something ! 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

The vowel U is formed by bringing the teeth to- 



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38 Molière 

gether without letting them quite touch, and thrusting 
out the lips, at the same time bringing them together 
without quite shutting them : U. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

U, u. Nothing could be truer: U. 

THE PHILOSOPHER 
Your lips are extended as îf you were pouting; 
therefore îf you wish to make a face at anyone, and 
mock at him, you hâve only to say U. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

U, U. T îs tnie. Ah ! would I had studied sooner, 
to know ail that ! 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

To-morrow, we wîll consider the other letters, 
namely the consonants. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Are there just as curious things about them as 
about thèse ? 

THE PHILOSOPHER 
Certaînly. The consonant D, for instance, îs pro- 
nounced by clapping the tip of the tongue just above 
the upper teeth : D. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

D, D. Yes ! Oh ! what fine things ! what fine 
things ! 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

The F, by resting the upper teeth on the lower 
Mp : F. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 39 

MR. JOURDAm 
F, F. 'T îs the very truth. Oh ! father and mothcr 
of me, what a grudge I owe you ! 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

And the R by lifting the tip of the tongue to the 
roof of the mouth ; so that being grazed by the air, 
whîch cornes out sharply, it yields to it, yet keeps 
retuming to the same point, and so makes a sort of 
trilling : R, Ra. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

R, R, Ra, R, R, R, R, R, Ra. That îs fine. Oh ! 
what a learned man you are, and how much time 
I Ve lost ! R, R, R, Ra. 

THE PHILOSOPHER 
I will explain ail thèse curions things to you 
thoroughly. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Do, I beg you. But now, I must tell you a great 
secret. I am in love with a person of very high rank, 
and I wish you would help me to write her something 
irt a little love-note which I '11 drop at her feet. 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

Excellent ! 

MR. JOURDAIN 
'T will be very gallant, will it not ? 

THE PHILOSOPHER 
Surely. Do you want to write to her in verse ? 



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40 Molière 

MR. JOURDAIN 

No, no ; none of your verse. 

THE PHILOSOPHER 
You want mère prose ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 
No, I will hâve neîther prose nor verse. 

THE PHILOSOPHER 
It must needs be one or the other. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Why? 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

For thîs reason, that there is nothing but prose or 
verse to express oneself by. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

There îs nothing but prose or verse? 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

No, sîr. AU that îs not prose îs verse, and ail that 
îs not verse îs prose. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

But when we talk, what îs that, say ? 

THE PHILOSOPHER 
Prose. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
What ! When I say : " Nîcole, bring me my 
slîppers and gîve me my nîghtcap," that 's prose ? 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 41 

THE PHILOSOPHER 
Yes, sîr. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
On my word, I Ve bcen speaking prose thèse forty 
years» and never knew it ; I am infinitely obliged to 
you for having informed me of this. Now I want to 
Write to her in a note: Fair Marquise^ y ont fait eyes 
maki me die of love; but I want it to be put in gallant 
fashion, and neatly turned. 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

Say that the fires of her eyes reduce your heart to 
ashes ; that night and day you suffer for her ail the 
tortures of a • • . 

MR. JOURDAIN 

No, no, no, I want none of ail that. I will hâve 
nothing but what I told you : Fair Marquise^ your 
fair eyes make me die of love. 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

You must enlarge upon the matter a little. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

No, I tell you. I '11 hâve none but those very 
words in the note, but put in a fashionable way, 
arranged as they should be. Pray tell me over the 
différent ways they can be put, so that I may see. 

THE PHILOSOPHER 

You can first of ail put them as you saîd : Fair 

Marquise^ your fair eyes make me die of love. Or 

else : Of lave to die me make, fair Marquise, your 

fair eyes. Or else : Your fair eyes of love me make. 



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42 Molière 

fair Marquise y ta die. Or else : To die your fait eyes, 
fait Marquise y of love me make. Or else : Me make 
your fair eyes die^ fair Marquise^ of love. , 

MR. JOURDAIN 

But which of ail thèse ways is the best? 

THE PHILOSOPHER 
The way you said it : Fair Marquise^ your fair 
eyes make me die of love. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

And y et 1 never studied, and I dîd ît at the first 
try. I thank you with ail my heart, and beg you to 
corne again to-morrow early, 

THE PHILOSOPHER 
I shall not fail to. 



SCENE VII 

Mr. Jourdain, Lackey 

MR. JOURDAIN, to the lackey 
What ! Hâve n't my clothes corne yet ? 

LACKEY 

No, sir. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

That cursed taîlor makes me wait a long whîle, on 

a day when l 'm so busy. I am furîous. May the 

quartan ague wrîng this villaîn of a tailor unmerci- 

f ully ! To the devil with the tailor ! Plague choke 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 43 

the taîlor ! If I had hîm hère now, that wretch of a 
tailor, that dog of a tailor, that scoundrel of a tailor, 
l 'd . . . 



SCENE VIII 

Mr. Jourdain, a Master-Tailor ; a Jôurneyman- 
Tailor, carrying Mr. Jourdain^ s suit; Lackey 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Ah ! se there you are ! I was just going to gct 
angry wîth you. 

MASTER-TAILOR 

I could not corne sooner, I had twenty men at 
work on your clothes. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
You sent me some sîlk stockîngs so tîght'that^I 
had dreadful work gettîng them on, and there are 
two stitches broke în them already, 

MASTER-TAILOR 

If anythîng, they will grow only too loose. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Yes, îf I keep on breakîng out stitches. And you 
made me some shoes that pinch horribly. 

MASTER-TAILOR 

Not at ail, sir. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

What I Not at ail ? 



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44 Molière 

MASTER-TAILOR 
No, they do not pînch you. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
I tell you they do pînch me. 

MASTER-TAILOR 

You imagine it. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

I imagine it because I feel it. A fine way, of talk- 
ing! 

MASTER-TAILOR 

There, this is one of the very handsomest and 
best matched of court costumes. 'T is a masterpiece 
to hâve invented a suit that is dignified, yet not of 
black; and l 'd give the most cultured tailors six 
trials and defy them to equal it. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

What 's this ? You hâve put the flowers upsîde 
down. 

MASTER-TAILOR 
You dîd n*t tell me you wanted them right end up. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Was there any need to tell you that ? 

MASTER-TAILOR 

Why, of course. Ail persons of quality wear them 
this way. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Persons of quality wear the flowers upsidé down ? 



A 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 45 

MASTER-TAILOR 

Yes, sîr. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Oh ! that 's ail rîght then. 

MASTER-TAILOR 

If you wîsh, I will put them rîght end up. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

No, no. 

MASTER-TAILOR 

You have only to say the word. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
No, I tell you ; you dîd rîghtly. Do you thînk 
the clothes wîU fit me ? 

MASTER-TAILOR 

i A pretty question ! I defy any painter, wîth hîs 

^— -n brush, to make you a doser fit. I have in my shop 

a fellow that îs the greatest genîus in the world for 

setting up a pair of German breeches ; and another 

who is the hero of our âge for the eut of a doublet. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Are the wîg and the feathers just as they should 
be? 

MASTER-TAILOR 
Ever)^ing is just right. 

MR. JOURDAIN, looking at the tailor's suit 
Ah I ah ! Mr. Tailor, hère is some of the cloth from 
my last suit you made me. I know it perfectly. 



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46 Molière 

MASTER-TAILOR 

The cloth seemed to me so fine that I thought 
well to eut a suit for myself eut of ît. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Yes ; but you ought net to hâve cabbaged ît out 
of mine. 

MASTER-TAILOR 

WîU you put on your suit ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Yes ; let me hâve it. 

MASTER-TAILOR 
Waît. That îs not the way to do things. I hâve 
brought my men with me to dress you to music; 
clothes such as thèse must be put on with ceremony. 
Ho ! enter, you fellows. 

S€;ENE IX 

Mr. Jourdain, Master-Tailor, Journeyman-Tailor; 

Dangers, in the costume of journeymen-tailors ; 

Lackey. 

MASTER-TAILOR, to hisjourneymen 
Put on the gentleman's suit, in the style you use 
for persons of quality. 

FIRST BALLET 

Enter four journeymen-tailors, two of whom pull off 

Mr. Jourdain's breeches that he had on for his exercise, 

and the other two his jacket ; then they put on his new 

suit ; and Mr. Jourdain walks about among them, show- 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 47 

ing off his suit, to see if it is ail right. Ail this to the 
accompaniment of full orchestra. 

JOURNEYMAN-TAILOR 

Noble Sir, please give the tailor's men something 
to drink. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
What dîd you call me ? 

JOURNEYMAN-TAILOR 

Noble Sîr. 

MR, JOURDAIN 

Noble Sîr ! That îs what ît is to dress as a person 
of quality ! You may go clothed as a tradesman ail 
your days, and nobody will call you Noble Sir. {Giv- 
ing hint money) There, that 's for Noble Sîr. 

JOURNEYMAN-TAILOR 

My Lord» we are greatly oblîged to you. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
My Lord ! Oh ! oh ! My Lord ! Waît, f riend ; 
My Lord deserves something, 't is no mean word, 
.My Lord I There, there 's what His Lordship gives 
you. 

JOURNEYMAN-TAILOR 
My Lord, we will ail go and drink Your Grace's 
health. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Your Grâce ! Oh ! oh ! oh ! waît ; don't go. Your 
Grâce, to me I {Asidé) Faith, îf he goes as far as 



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48 Molière 

Your Highness he'll empty my purse. (Alaud) 
There, there 's for Your Grâce. 

JOURNEYMAN-TAILOR 

My Lord, we thank you most humbly for your 
generosîty. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

He dîd well to stop. I was just going to gîve ît 
ail to him. 

SECOND BALLET 
The four journeymen-tailors celebrate Mr. Jourdain's 
liberality with a dance, which forms the second interlude. 



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J 



ACT III 

SCENE I 

Mr. Jourdain, Two Lackeys 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Follow me, while I takè a walk and show my 
clothes through the town; and by ail means take 
care, both of you, to walk close at my heels, so that 
everyone may be sure you belong to me. 

LACKEY 
Yes, sîr. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Call Nicole hère, I want to gîve her some orders. 
No, don't move ; hère she cornes. 

SCENE II 
Mr. Jourdain, Nîodi-E, Two Lackeys 



Nicole ! 

Yes, sir? 
Listen. 



MR. JOURDAIN 
NICOLE 

MR. JOURDAIN 
49 

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50 Molière 

NICOLE, laughing 
He, he, he, he, he. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

What are you laughing at ? 

NICOLE 
He, he, he, he, he, he. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

What does the hussy mean ? 

NICOLE 
He, he, he. What a figure you eut ! He, he, he. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

How now ? 

NICOLE 

Oh ! oh ! my gracîous ! He, he, he, he, he. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

What a jade hâve we hère? Are you making 
sport of me ? 

NICOLE 
' No, no, sîr ; I should be very sorry to do so. He 
he, he, he, he, he. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

I '11 gîve you one on the nose, îf you laugh any 
more. 

NICOLE 

Sir, I can't help ît. He, he, he, he, he, he. 



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The Tradesman Tumed Gentleman 51 

' MR. JOURDAIN 

Won*t you hâve done? 

NICOLE 
Sir, I ask your pardon ; but you look so funny, I 
can't keep from laughing. He, he» he. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Just see her insolence ! 

NICOLE 

You *re downright comical like that. He, he. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

I 'U . • . 

NICOLE 

Oh, please forgive me. He, he, he, he. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Look hère, if you laugh again the least bit in 
the world, I swear I '11 give you the worst cuffing 
that ever was. 

NICOLE 

Well ! sir, ît *s over ; I won't laugh any more. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Mind you don't. You must clean up for this 
dftemoon . . , 

NICOLE 
He, he. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Clean up properly . . . 



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52 Molière 

NICOLE 

He, he. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

You musty I say, clean up the great hall and • • • 

NICOLE 

He, he. 

MR, JOURDAIN 

What, agaîn ? 

NICOLE, tumbling down with laughter 
Oh, sîr, beat me if you like, but let me hâve my 
laugh out ; 't will be better for me so, He, he, he. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

1 11 go mad ! 

NICOLE 

For goodness sake, sîr, I beseech you let me laugh. 
He, he, he. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
If I begîn to • . • 

NICOLE 

Sî-sîr, I shall bu-burst îf I can't laugh. He, he, he. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Was ever such a hussy seen, to come and laugh 
impudently în my face, înstead of takîng my orders? 

NICOLE 
What do you want me to do, sîr? 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 53 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Take care, you slut, to get my house ready for 
the Company that is to corne presently, 

NICOLE, picking herself up 
Ah ! faith» I Ve no désire to laugh any more ; ail 
your Company makes such a litter in the place that 
the very word 's enough to put me out of temper. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Of course I ought to shut my doors to everyone, to 
please you ? 

NICOLE 

You ought at least to shut them to certain people. 

SCENE III 
Mrs. Jourdain, Mr. Jourdain, Nicole, Two Lackeys 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Aha ! Hère 's a fresh extravagance ! Now look 
hère, husband, what îs ail this outfit? Hâve you 
lost your sensés to go and harness yourself up in 
such a fashion? D'ye want to make yourself a 
laughing-stock everywhere ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

None but fools, wîfe, will laugh at me. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
Many will they, and they hâve n't waited tîU now 
neither; long enough already your doings hâve 
made everybody laugh. 



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54 Molière 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Now who îs that everybody, îf you please î 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
That everybody îs a body that îs în the right, and 
has more sensé than you hâve. For my part, l 'm 
scandalîsed at the lîfe you lead. I don't know what 
to call our house any more. Anybody would say ît' 
îs carnival hère every day ; from the first thîng în 
the mornîng, for fear you should lose a mînute, 
there's nothing but caterwauling of fiddlers and 
sîngersy that disturbs the whole neîghbourhood. 

NICOLE 
Madam says true. I can never get the house to 
rîghtSy with ail this gang of folks that you brîng în. 
Theîr feet ransack every quarter of the town for mud 
to brîng în hère ; and our poor Françoîse îs almost 
wom out wîth scrubbîng the floors your pretty mas- 
ters daub as regularly as the day comes round. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Hoîty-toîty, maîd Nîcolel you hâve a mîghty 
quîck tongue for a peasant wench ! 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Nicole îs right ; she has more sensé than you hâve. 
l 'd lîke to know what use you hâve for a dancîng- 
master» at your tîme of life. 

NICOLE 

And for a great gawk of a fencîng-master, who 
comes stampîng round and shakîng the whole house 
down, and tears up ail the tîles în the floor. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman ss 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Silence, you, servant, and you, wîfe. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Do you want to learn to dance, against the tîme 
you '11 hâve no more legs? 

NICOLE 

Do you want to murder somebody ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Silence, I say; you are both ignoramuses. You 
don't know the prérogatives of ail this. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
You 'd do much better to think of getting your 
daughter marrîed, now that she 's of an âge to be 
established in life. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
I shall think of marrying my daughter when there 
appears a fit match for her, but in the meantime 
I shall think of leaming fine things. 

NICOLE 

What 's more, madam, I Ve heard that to-day, to 
make the mess worse, he 's got him a philosopher. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
In good deed I hâve. I mean to hâve leaming, 
and know how to talk upon various subjects in 
polite Society. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Won't you go to school one of thèse days, and 
get a floggîng, at your âge ? 



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56 Molière 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Why not? Would to God I were flogged pre- 
sently, and before everyone, could I but know the 
things they leam at school ! 

NICOLE 
Yes, faith, that would mightily help the shape o£ 
your legs. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Yes îndeed. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Ail that îs mîghty needful for the management of 
your house. 

MR. JOURDAIN ^- 

Certainly it is. You both talk like idiots, and I 
am ashamed of your ignorance. {To Mrs. Jourdain) 
Now do you know, for instance, what you are speak- 
ing at this moment ? 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Yes, I know that what I am speaking is mighty 
well spoken, and that you ought to change your ways. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

I don't mean that. l 'm asking you what the 
words are that you are speaking now? 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

They 're mighty sensible, and that *s more than 
can be said of your conduct. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

I don't mean that, I tell you. l 'm asking you 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 57 

what this îs that l 'm speaking to you, that I *m 
saying to you now ? 

MRS. JOURDAIN ' 

'T is stuff and nonsense. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
No, no, ît îs not that. What are both of us say- 
ing, the language we are usîng at this moment ? 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Well? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Whatisitcalled? 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

It ÎS called whatever you please to call ît. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
It ÎS prose, ignoramus. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Prose? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Yes, prose. AU that is prose is not verse ; and ail 
that îs not verse is not prose. There ! see what it is 
to study. {To Nicole) Now you, do you know what 
you must do to say U ? 

NICOLE 
How? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Ves. What do you do when you say U? 



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; 


Molière 




NICOLE 


What? 






MR. JOURDAIN 


Just say U, to 


see. 




NICOLE 


Well! U, 






MR. JOURDAIN 


What did you 


do? 



NICOLE 
I said U. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Yes ; but when you saîd U, what dîd you do? 

NICOLE 
I did as you bid me. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Oh! what a thîng ît is to hâve to deal wîth 
dunces ! You thrust out your lips, and let the under 
jaw fall to meet the upper: U, d' ye see? U, 
I make a face : U. 

NICOLE 
Yes, *t is fine. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Quîte wonderful. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
'T îs stîU finer if you had only seen O, and D, D, 
and F, F. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 59 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

What *s ail thîs rigmarole ? 

NICOLE 

What does ît ail cure you of ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

It makes me furious to see such ignorant females. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Go to, you ought to send ail those folks packing, . 
wîth theîr fol-de-rols. 

NICOLE 

Especîally that great scraggy lout of a fencîng- 
master, who fiUs my whole house wîth dust. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Hoîty-toîty, that fencîng-master sticks în your 
crop! l'U show you your foolishness presently. 
{He orders the foils to be brought^ and gives one to 
Nicole.') There, now for démonstrative proof. The 
line of the body. When anyone thrusts at you in 
quart you hâve only to do this, and when one thrusts 
at you în tierce, you hâve only to do this. That 's 
the sure way never to be kîUed ; and is n't ît a fine 
thîng to know what to trust to when you hâve to 
fight anyone ? Now, thrust at me a little, to see. 

NICOLE 

Well then! Now. {^Nicole gives him several 
thrusts.) 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Softiyl Ho! Holdl Ohîgentiy. Deucetakc 
the minx ! 



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6o Molière 

NICOLE 

You tell me to thrust. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Yes; but you thrust at me in tierce before you 
thrust în quart, and you don't hâve patience to wait 
tîU I parry. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
You 're out of your mînd, husband, with ail yourA 
fads ; it has ail come upon you sînce you Ve taken ij: \y 
into your head to keep company with the nobility. ' 

MR. JOURDAIN 
In keeping company with the nobility I show my | 
judgment ; 't is much better than herding with your 
vulgar sort. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
Yes, my faith and trothl there îs much to be 
gained by going with your nobility, and you Ve 
made gfreat work on *t with this fine gentleman the 
Count, whom you 're so bewitched with ! 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Silence ; take care what you say. Do you know^ 
wife, that you don't know of whom you 're speaking, 
when you speak of him? He is a person of more 
importance than you think, a great lord who is re- 
spected at court, and who speaks to the king just for 
ail the world as l 'm talking to you now. Is n't ît a 
thing that does me huge honour, to hâve a person of 
his quality come to see me so often» and call me hîs 
dear friend, and treat me as if I were his equal? 
He has such kindness for me as you *d never guess ; 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 6i 

and he embraces me before people so much that I 
am confounded at ît tnyself. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Yes, he 's mîghty kind and caressing wîth you ; 
but he borrows your money. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Well ! îs n't ît an honour to me, to lend money to 
a man of his rank? And could I do less for a lord 
who calls me hîs dear friend ? 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
And what does this lord do for you ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Thîngs that would astonish you, if you dîd but 
know them. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
WeU,what? 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Enough! I cannot explaîn myself. *Tîs sufficîent 
that if I hâve lent him money, he wîU pay it back 
exactly, and that before long. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
Yes. Just you wait till he does. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Certainly. Dîd n't he say he would ? 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Yes, yes, you can trust him — not to. 



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62 Molièrb 

MR. JOURDAIN 

He swore to me on his honour as a gentleman. \ 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Rubbish! 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Heyday ! you are hugely obstinate, wîfe ! I tell 
you he will keep his word to me ; I am sure of it 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

And I am sure he won't ; and ail the caresses he 
loads you with are only to wheedle you. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Hold your tongue. Hère he cornes. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
That is the last straw. Perhaps he 's coming to 
borrow some more of you. The veiy sight of hîm 
takes away my appetite. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Hold your tongue, I tell you. 



SCENE IV 

Dorante, Mr. Jourdain, Mrs. Jourdain, Nicole 

DORANTE 
My dear friend, Mr. Jourdain, how are you to-day ? 
MR. JOURDAIN 

Very well, sir, and humbly at your service. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 63 

DORANTE 

And Mrs. Jourdain there, how does she do ? 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Mrs. Jourdain does as well as she can. 

DORANTE 

Why ! Mr. Jourdain, you 're dressed most gen- 
teelly. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

As you see. 

DORANTE 

You make a fine figure in that suit! There 's 
never a young fellow at court that is better set up 
than you are. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Eh, eh! 

MRS. JOURDAIN, aside 
He scratches him where it itches. 

DORANTE 

Tum round. 'T is altogether élégant 

MRS. JOURDAIN, aside 
Yes, as much fool behînd as before. 

DORANTE 
Ton honour, Mr. Jourdain, I was in a great impa- 
tience to see you. You are the man I esteem most 
in ail the world ; and I was speaking of you agam, 
thîs mornîng, in the Kîng's bed-chamber. 



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64 Molière 

MR, JOURDAIN 

You do me much honour, sir. {To Mrs. Jourdain) 
In the King's bed-chamber ! 

DORANTE 

Corne, put your hat on. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Sir, I know the respect I owe to you. 

DORANTE 

Bless me, put it on. No ceremony between us, I 
beseech you. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Sir . . . 

DORANTE 

Put ît on, I tell you, Mr. Jourdain ; you are my 
friend. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Sir, I am your humble servant. 

DORANTE 

I wîU not be covered unless you are. 

MR. JOUKOAllff putting' on Au hat 
I '11 rather be unmannerly than troublesome. 

DORANTE 

I am your debtor, as you know. 

MRS. JOURDAIN, aside 
Yes ; we know it only too welL 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 65 

DORANTE 
You have generously lent me money on several 
occasions, and have done me that service wîth the 
best grâce în the world, I must say. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Oh! sîr. 

DORANTE 

But I know how to repay what îs lent me, and 
show my gratitude for the favours done me. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

I do not doubt ît, sîr. 

DORANTE 

I want to settle wîth you, and have come now to 
make up our accounts together. 

MR. JOURDAIN, oside to Mrs. Jourdain 
There, wîfe ! you see how wrong you were. 

DORANTE 

I lîke to get out of debt as soon as I can. 

MR. JOURDAIN, aside to Mrs. Jourdain 
I told 3rou so. 

DORANTE 
Let nis see how much I owe you. 

MR. JOURDAIN, aside to Mrs. Jourdain 
Now where are you, wîth your absurd suspicions? 

DORANTE 

Do you remember exactly ail the money you have 
lent me ? 



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66 Molière 

MR. JOURDAIN 
I think so. I hâve made a little mémorandum of 
it. Hère it is. Griven to you at one time, two hun- 
dred louis. 

DORANTE 
True. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Another time, six score. 

DORANTE 

Just so. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

And another time, one hundred and forty. 
DORANTE 

Right. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Thèse three items make four hundred and sixty 
louisy which come to five thousand and sixty francs. 

DORANTE 

The reckoning is exact. Five thousand and sixty 
francs. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

One thousand eight hundred and thirty-two francs 
to your feather-merchant. 

DORANTE 

Precisely. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 67 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Two thousand seven hundred and eighty francs to 
your tailor. 

DORANTE 
Right again. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Four thousand three hundred and seventy-nine 
francs, twelve sous, and eîght deniers to your draper. 

DORANTE 

Excellent. Twelve sous and eight deniers; the 
account is exact. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

And one thousand seven hundred and forty-eight 
francs, seven sous, and four deniers to your saddler. 

DORANTE 
Eyery thîng is correct. How much does it ail make ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Sum total, fifteen thousand eight hundred francs. 

DORANTE 
Sum total, right. Fifteen thousand eight hundred 
francs. Now add two hundred pistoles more which 
you wîU gîve me : that wîU make exactly eighteen 
thousand francs, which I will pay you at the earliest 
opportunîty. 

MRS. JOURDAIN, oside to Mr. Jourdain 
Well ! dîd n't I guess right ? 



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68 Molière 

MR. JOURDAIN, oside to Mrs. Jourdain 
Silence. 

DORANTE 

Will ît inconvenience you, to gîve me the sum in 
question ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Oh! no. 

MRS. JOURDAIN, oside to Mr. Jourdain 
The fellow takes you for a milch cow. 

MR. JOURDAIN, oside to Mrs. Jourdain 
Hold your tongue. 

DORANTE 

If it incommodes you, I will go seek it elsewhere. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

No, sir. 

MRS. JOURDAIN, osidi to Mr. Jourdain 
He will net be satisfied till he has ruined you. 

MR. JOURDAIN, dside to Mrs. Jourdain 
Hold your tongue, I tell you. 

DORANTE 
If it puts you out, you need only say so. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
By no means, sir. 

MRS. JOURDAIN, asidc to Mr. Jourdain 
He 's a regular swindler. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 69 

MR. JOURDAIN, oside to Mrs. Jourdain 
Be still, wîU you ! 

MRS, JOURDAIN, aside to Mr. Jourdain 
He *11 drain you to the last penny. 

MR. JOURDAIN, aside to Mrs. Jourdain 
Will you be stiU ? 

DORANTE 
There are many people who would gladly lend it 
to me, but sînce you are my best frîend, I thought 
I should be wronging you if I asked anyone else 
for ît. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
You do me too much honour, sin I wiil go fetch 
ît for you. 

MRS. JOURDAIN, aside to Mr. Jourdain 
What ! You are going to let hîm hâve that too ? 

MR. JOURDAIN, c^ide to Mrs. Jourdain 
What can I do? Would you bave me refuse a 
man of his rank, who spoke of me this mornîng in 
the Kîng's bed-chamber ? 

MRS. JOURDAIN, aside to Mr. Jourdain 
Go to, you are a downright dupe. 

SCENE V 

Dorante, Mrs. Jourdain, Nicole 

DORANTE 

You seem quîte pensive. What îs the matter, 
Mrs. Jourdain ? 



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70 Molière 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

I Ve a head that 's bigger than a fist, and it 's not 
swollen, either. 

DORANTE 

And where is your daughter, that I hâve n't seen 
her? 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
My daughter is ail right where she is. 

DORANTE 

How does she get on ? 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
On her two legs. 

DORANTE 

Wîll you not some day bring her to see the ballet 
and the play that are given at the Kîng's? 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Yes, faîth ! We hâve a great fancy for laughing, 
a great fancy for laughing hâve we. 

DORANTE 
I think, Mrs. Jourdain, you must hâve had many 
lovers when you were young, being so handsome 
and sweet-tempered. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

By 'r Lady, sir ! Is Mrs. Jourdain décrépit, and 
does her head wag already ? 

DORANTE 
Oh, 'pon honour, Mrs. Jourdain, I beg your par- 



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The Tradesman Tumed Gentleman 71 

don I I forgot that you are young now. I am so 
often absent-minded. I beg you to excuse my 
impertinence. 



SCENE VI 

Mr. Jourdain, Mrs. Jourdain, Dorante, Nicole 

MR. JOURDAIN, to Dorante 
Hère are two hundred louis iii good cash. 

DORANTE 

I assure you, Mr. Jourdain, that I am yours with 
ail my heart, and I long to do you some service at 
court. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
I am exceedingly obliged to you. 

DORANTE 

If Mrs. Jourdain would like to see the royal diver- 
sions, I will get her the best seats in the ball-room. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
Mrs. Jourdain is your humble servant. 

DORANTE, aside to Mr. Jourdain 
Oûr faîr Marquise, as I told you in my letter, will 
corne hère presently for the ballet and collation ; I 
hâve at last persuaded her to accept the treat you 
wîsh to gîve her. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Let us go a lîttle farther ofî, for good reason. 



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72 Molière 

DORANTE 
'T is a week since I saw you ; and I hâve sent you 
no news of the diamond you put in my hands to 
give her in your name; that is because I had the 
greatest difficulty in overcoming her scruples ; and 
it was not till to-day that she could be brought to 
accept it. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

How did she like it ? 

DORANTE 
Marveilous well ; and unless I am much mistaken, 
the beauty of this diamond will do wonders with her 
in your favour. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Heaven grant it ! 

MRS. JOURDAIN, to Nicole 
Once he is with him» he can never leave him. 

DORANTE 
I cried up properly to her the richness of your 
présent, and the violence of your love. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

This, sir, is kindness that quite overwhelms me ; I 
am in the greatest confusion, to see a person of your 
quality lower himself for my sake to such things as 
you do. 

DORANTE 
You dpn't mean it. Does one ever stop at such 
scruples, between frîends? Would you not do as 
much for me, if the occasion offered ? 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 73 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Oh, surely, and wîth ail my heart. 

MRS. JOURDAIN, to Nicole 
How his présence weighs upon me I 

DORANTE 

For my part, I stick at nothing when a friend is to 
be served ; se, as soon as you confided to me the 
passion ybu had conceived for this charming Mar- 
quise, with whom I was intimate, you saw how I 
ofîered at once, and of my own accord, to serve 
your love. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

True. Such kindness fills me with confusion. 

MRS. JOURDAIN, tû NicoU 

Will he never be gone ? 

NICOLE 
They seem very thick together. 

DORANTE 

You hâve gone the rîght way about ît to touch her 
heart. Women love above ail things the expense 
we are at on their account ; your fréquent sérénades, 
your bouquets sent every day, the magnificent dis- 
play of fireworks which she found prepared for her 
on the water, the diamond she received from you, 
and the entertainment you are now arranging for 
her, ail speak in favour of your love better thap any 
words you could hâve said to her yourself. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

There is no expense I would not go to, if thereby 



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74 Molière 

I might find the way to her heart. A woman of 
quality has entrancing charms for me ; 't is an honour 
I would buy at any cost. 

MRS, JOURDAIN, ostde to NkoU 
What can they hâve to talk about so much ? Just 
go up quietly and listen. 

DORANTE 

You shall presently enjoy at your ease the plea- 
sure of seeing her; and your eyes shall hâve fuU 
time to feast themselves. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
To be fuUy at liberty, I hâve arranged to hâve my 
wife go and dine at xny sister's, and spend ail the 
afternoon there. 

DORANTE 
You dîd wîsely, for your wife mîght hâve been in . 
the way. I hâve given the necessary orders for you 
to the cook, and for everything that îs needful în 
the ballet. It îs my own invention, and if the ex- 
ecution is adéquate to the conception, I am sure it 
will be thought ... 

MR. JOURDAIN, seeifig that Nicole is listening^ and 
giving her a cuff 
Odso! you're mighty impertinent. {To Dorante) 
Let us go out, if you please. 

SCENE VII 
Mrs. Jourdain, Nicols 

NICOLE 

Faith, ma*am, my curîosity has cost me some- 



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The Tradesman Tumed Gentleman 75 

thing, but I thînk there 's mîschîef afoot ; they Ve 
talking about some affair they don't want you to beat. 
MRS. JOURDAIN 
This is not the first time, Nicole, that I hâve had 
suspicions o£ my husband. Either l 'm much ixiis- 
taken, or there *s some love-a£fair in the wînd ; I am 
doing my best to discover what it can be. But let's 
think of my daughten You know Cléonte's love 
for her ; he is a man after my own heart ; and I mean 
to favour his suit» and let him hâve Ludle, if I can. 

NICOLE 

Trothy ma'am» I am mightily charmed to find you 
in this way of thinking ; for if the master hits your 
f ancy» the man pleases mine no less, and I could wish 
our marriage might be made under the shadow of 
theirs. 

MRS, JOURDAIN 

Go and speak to him of ît, from me, and tell hîm 
to corne and see me presently, so that we may joîn 
in asking my husband for his daughter's hand. 

' NICOLE 
I fly with joy, ma'am ; I could n't hâve a pleasanter 
errand. {Aloné) Methinks I shall make some people 
mighty bappy. 

SCENE VIII 

Clbontb, Coviei-le, NICOI-» 

NICOLE, to Cléonte 
Ah ! hcre you are in the nîck o' tîme! I am an 
ambassadress of joy, and hâve corne to . . . 



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76 Molière 

CLEONTE 

Begone, perfidious girl, and don*t corne wasting 
my time wîth treacherous words. 

NICOLE 

Is that the way you receîve • . • 

CLEONTE 

Begone, I say ; go thîs instant and tell your false 
mistress she shall never more deceîve the too credu- 
lous Cléonte. 

- NICOLE 

What crazy whîm îs thîs ? My dear Covielle, do 
tell me what it means. 

COVIELLE 

Your dear Covîelle, minx ! Go, quick, out of my 
sighty hussy, and let me alone. 

NICOLE 

What ! do you too ... ? 

COVIELLE 

Out of my sight, I say, and never speak to me 
again as long as you live. 

NICOLE, aside 
Hoity-toîty! what a flea's in both their ears? 
I '11 go tell my mistress of thèse fine doings. 

SCENE IX 
Cleonte, Covîelle 

CLEONTE 
What! treat a lover in such fashion, and that 
lover the most constant and passionate of lovers I 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 77 

COVIELLE 

T îs a horrîd trîck they hâve served us both, 

CLEONTE 

I show a young woman ail the ardour and tender- 
ness that can be imagined ; I love nothing but her 
în ail the world, and think of naught but her ; she 
is my only care, my only hope, my only joy; I 
speak but of her, I think but of her, I dream but of 
her, for her alone I live and breathe ; and such, now, 
îs the fit reward of ail my dévotion ! I live without 
seeing her for two whole days, that seem to me two 
frightful centuries; then fortune lets me meether; 
my heart, at the sight, feels ail elated, my joy shines 
în my face, I fly to her în ecstasy, and the traitress 
turns away her eyes, and passes brusquely by, as if 
în ail her lîfe she 'd never seen me ! 

COVIELLE 

I say the same as you. 

CLEONTE 
Was anything ever known, Covîelle, lîke the per- 
fidy of the ungrateful Lucîle ? 

COVIELLE 
Or likc that, sir, of the jade Nicole? 

CLEONTE 
After ail the ardent sacrifices, ail the sighs and 
vows, that I hâve laid upon the altar of her charms ! 

COVIELLE 
After ail the attentions, ail the cares and services, 
that I hâve rendered her în her kîtchen ! 



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78 Molière 

CLEONTE 

Ail the tears I hâve poured at her feet ! 

COVIELLE 

AU the buckets of water I hâve drawn for her at 
the well ! 

CLEONTE 

Ail the warmth I hâve shown în cherishing her 
more than myself ! 

COVIELLB 

AU the heat I hâve borne in tuming the spît in 
her stead ! 

CLEONTE 

She avoids me with disdain ! 

COVIELLE 
She turns her back on me with impudence ! 

CLEONTE 

T is perfidy that is worthy of the utmost pun- 
ishment. 

COVIELLE 
T is treason that deserves a thousand cuflfs, 

CLEONTE 

Pray never thînk of speaking in her favoun 

COVIELLE 

What, I, sir ? Heaven f orbid ! 

CLEONTE 

Do not, ah ! do not paUiate the conduct of this 
traitress. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 79 

COVIELLE 
Never fear. 

CLEONTE 

No, don't you understand, ail you can say în her 
defence will be quite useless. 

COVIELLE 

Who dreams of such a thing ? 

CLEONTE 

I mean to cherish my resentment, and break off ail 
intercourse. 

COVIELLE 
I grive my consent. 

CLEONTE 

This same Count who haunts the house bas per- 
haps caught her fancy ; I can well see she 's dazzled 
by the quality. I must, for my own honour, fore* 
stall the triumph of her faithlessness. I am deter- 
mined to make as much haste as she toward the 
change I find she 's seeking, and not to leave her ail 
the crédit of abandoning me. 

COVIELLE 
'T is bravely spoken, and I share ail your feelings. 

CLEONTE 
Yes, second my resentment, and support my reso- 
lution against whatever lingering love might yet 
plead with me for hen Say of her, I entreat you, 
ail the îU you can. Draw me a portrait of her that 
shall make her despicable to me, and to disgust me 
with her insist on ail the defects you can find in her. 



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8o Molière 

J^ COVIELLE 

In her ? Ho ! a fine affected minx, a pretty lîttle 
squeamish beauty, to make you so enamoured of 
her ! I see in her nothing but what 's most in- 
diffèrent ; and you can find a hundred fair ones more 
worthy of you. In the first place, she has small eyes. 

CLEONTB 

'T îs true her eyes are small, but they are fuU of 
fire, they are the most sparkling, the most piercing, 
the most sympathetîc eyes ever seen. 

COVIELLE 

Her mouth is large. 

CLEONTE 

Yes ; but it has a grâce in it net to be found in 
other mouths ; the very sight of it rouses désire, 't is 
the most winning, the loveliest in the world. 

COVIELLE 

As for her figure, she 's little. 
CLEONTB 
Yes ; but she 's graceful and well proportioned. 

COVIELLE 

She affects a certain indifférence in her speech 
and manner. 

CLEONTE 

True ; but she has such a grâce in it ail, and her 
ways are so engaging, with an indescribable charm 
that wins its way to people*s hearts. 

COVIELLE 
As to wit . . . 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman Si 



CLEONTE 

Ah ! that she has, Covielle, and the subtiest and 
most délicate. 

COVIELLE 
Her conversation . . • 

CLEONTE 
Her conversation is charming. 

COVIELLE 
She is always grave. 

CLEONTE 

Would you hâve boisterous gaiety, and ever- 
bubbling merriment ? Is there anything more foolish 
than those women that are always giggling? 

COVIELLE 
But anyhowy she 's as capricious as can be. 

CLEONTE 
Yes, she 's capricious, that I grant you ; but every- 
thing is becoming in a pretty woman ; we bear with 
everything from the sex. 

COVIELLE 
Since that is the way of ît, I see plainly that you 
mean to love her still. 



CLEONTE 
I ? I had rather die ; I shall hâte her as much as 
once I loved. 

COVIELLE 
How can you, if you think her so perfect? 



( 



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8a Molière 

CLEONTE 

Thereby shall my vengeance be ail the more signal, 
thereby shall I better show the strength of my 
resolution, in hating and abandoning her, so fair, so 
full of charm, so lovely as she is. Hère she cornes. 

SCENE X 

LuciLE, Cleonte, Covielle, Nicole 

NICOLE, to Lucile 
For my part, I was altogether scandalised at it. 

LUCILE 

It can be nothing else but what I told you, Nicole. 
But there he is. 

CLEONTE, to Covielle 
I will not so much as speak to her. 

COVIELLE 

I will follow your example. 

LUCILE 

What is it, Cléonte ? What Ls the matter ? 

NICOLE 

What ails you, Covielle ? 

LUCILE 
What anger possesses you ? ' 

NICOLE 

What tantnim bas seized you now? 

LUCILE 

Are you dumb, Cléonte? 



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NICOLE 

Have you lost your tongue, Covîelle ? 

CLEONTE 

How abandoned ! 

COVIELLE 

What a Judas ! 

LUCILE 

I see plainly that our meeting thîs mornîng has 
displeased you. 

CLEONTE, to Cavielle 
Oh ! oh ! She sees what she has done. 

NICOLE 

Our réception thîs mornîng has put you în a hufif. 

COVIELLE, to Cléonte 
They Ve guessed where the shoe pinches. 

LUCILE 

Is 't not so, Cléonte ? Is not that the reason of 
your vexation ? 

CLEONTE 
Yes, traîtress, that it is, since I must speak ; and I 
can tell you that you shall not triumph, as you think, 
în your faîthlessness ; for I shall be beforehand in 
breaking with you, and you shall not have the crédit 
of discarding me. I shall find it hard, no doubt, to 
overcome my love for you ; ît will gîve me pain, I 
shall suffer for a whîle ; but I shall compass it, and 
wîU rather thrust a dagger through my beart than be 
so weak as to corne back to you. 



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84 Molière 

COVIELLE, to Nicole 
As he, so me. 

LUCILE 

Hère 's much ado about nothing. I '11 tell you, 
Cléonte, what made me avoid you this morning. 

CLEONTE, starting away to avoid Lucile 
No, I won't lîsten to anythîng. 

NICOLE, to Covielle 
I '11 let you know the cause of our passing you by 
so quickly. 

COVIELLE, starting away to avoid Nicole 
I won't hear a word. 

. LUCILE, following Cléonte 
Thîs mornîng, you see . . . 

CLEONTE, walking about without heeding Lucile 
No, I say. 

NICOLE, following Covielle 
Let me tell you . . . 

COVIELLE, walking about without heeding Nicole 
No, you jîlt ! 

LUCILE 
Listen. 

CLEONTE 

No use. 

NICOLE 
Hark to me. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 85 



COVIELLE 



l 'm deaf. 

Cléonte ! 

No. 

Covielle ! 

Never. 

Waît. 

Nonsense. 

Hear me. 

Stuff. 

Just for a moment 

Kot for anythîng. 

Waît a bit. 

Fîddlcstîcks. 

Just a Word or two. 



LUCILE 
CLEONTE 

NICOLE 
COVIELLE 

LUCILE 
CLEONTE 

NICOLE 
COVIELLE 

LUCILE 

CLEONTE 
NICOLE 

COVIELLB 
LUCILE 



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86 Molière 

CLEONTB 

Na Ail îs over between us. 

r NICOLE 

Just one word. 

COVIELLE 

l 'U hâve no more to do with you. 

LUCILE, stopping 
Well ! since you won't listen to me» go on and do 
as you please.^ 

NICOLE, stopping also 
Since that *s the way with you, take it as you will. 

CLEONTE, turning taward Lucile 
Well then, let us hear the reason of our fine ré- 
ception. 

LUCILE, turning away to avoid Cléonte 
I don't care, now, to tell you. 

COVIELLE, turning toward Nicole 
Tell us about the business, then. 

NICOLE, walkingaway to avoid Covielle 
I don't choose to, not I. 

CLEOi^rT'Ej foUowing Lucile 
Tell me . • . 

LUCILE, stiïl walking away without heeding Cléonte 
No, I won't tell you ans^hing. 

COVIELLE^ follozving Nicole 
Let us hear the story. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 87 

NICOLE, still walking away without heeding Covielle 
No, you *11 hear no story f rom me. 

CLEONTE 



I beg you ! 
No, I say. 
For pîty's sake. 
No use. 
I beseech you. 
Let me be. 
I entreat you. 
Away wîth you.' 
Ludle ! 
No. 

Nicole 1 
Nevcr. 



LUCILB 
COVIELLE 

NICOLE 
CLEONTE 

LUCILE 
COVIELLE 

NICOLE 
CLEONTE 

LUCILB 
COVIELLE 

NICOLE 



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88 Molière 

CLEONTB 

In Heaven's name ! 

LUCILB 

I wîll not. 

COVIELLB 

Speak to me. 

OTCOLB 
Net for anything. 

CLEONTB 

Clear up my doubts. 

LUCILE 

No, I wîll do nothîng of the sort. 

COVIELLE 
Cure my pain. 

NICOLE 

No, I don't care to. 

€LEONTE 

Well ! sînce you are so lîttle concerned to ease me 
of my suffering and justîfy yourself for the un- 
worthy manner în which you hâve treated my love, 
this is the last time, ungrateful girl, that you shall 
ever see me; I shall go far away from you, to die of 
grief and love. 

COVIELLE, to Nicole 
And I shall foUow in his footsteps. 

LUCILE9 to Clionte ashe is going 
Cléonte I 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman sg 

NICOLE, /û Cavielle^ as he is going- 
Covîelle ! 

CLEONTE, StOpping 
Eh? 

COVIELLE, StOpping too 
What say ? 

LUCILB 
Where are you goîng ? 

CLEONTB 
Where I told you. 

COVIELLE 
We arc going to die. 

LUCILB 
You are going to die, Cléonte ? 

CLÈONTE 

Yes, cruel one, since you will hâve it so. 

LUCILB 
I ! I will hâve you die ? 

CLEONTB 
Yes, you will it. 

LUCILB 
Who tells you that ? 

CLEONTB, going nearer to Lucile 
Do you not will it, when you refuse to clear up 
tay suspicions ? 

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90 Molière 

LUCILE 

Is that my fault? If you had been willing to 
listen to me» should I not hâve told you that the 
affair you resent was caused by the présence thîs 
morning of an old aunt» who insists that the mère 
approach of a man dishonours a girl, and is forever 
preaching at us on this text» and representing ail 
men as so many devils that we must flee from ? 

NICOLE, tû CovielU 
That is the whole secret. 

CLEONTB 

Are you not deceiving me, Lucile? 

COVIELLE, to Nicole 
Are n't you putting a trick on me ? 

LUCILE, to Cléonte 
Nothing could be truer. 

NICOLE, to CovielU 
That is just how it is. 

COVIELLE, to Cléonte 
Shall we give in to this? 

CLEONTE 

Ah ! Lucile, how you can with one word brîng 
back peace to my heart ; how easily we let ourselves 
be persuaded by those we love. 

COVIELLE 

How easily we are wheedled by thèse little devils. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 91 

SCENE XI 

Mrs. Jourdain, Cleonte, Lucile, Covislle, Nicole 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
I am very glad to see you, Cléonte ; you are hère 
in the nick of time. My husband is coming; seize 
this chance to ask him for Lucile. 

CLEONTE 
Ah ! madam, how dear are your words, how they 
flatter my désires! Could I receive a command 
more charming, a favour more precious? 

SCENE XII 

Cleonte, Mr. Jourdain, Mrs. Jourdain, Lucile, 
CoviELLE, Nicole 

CLEONTE 
Sir, I would let no one speak for me, to make of 
you a request that I hâve long had in my thoughts. 
It concerns me so closely that I must do it myself, 
and without further circumlocution I will înform you 
that the honour of being your son-in-law îs a proud 
favour which I beg you to grant me. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Before giving you your answer, sir, I beg you to 
tell me whether you are a gentleman. 

CLEONTE 

Sir, on this point most people would not hesîtate 
long; the Word îs easily spoken. People bave no 
scruple about assuming the title, and common cus- 
tom nowadays seems to authorise the theft. But I 
must own that I feel somewhat more delîcately upon 



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92 Molière 

thîs subject. I think any imposture is univorthy of 
a true man, and there is a baseness in disguising that 
birth which Heaven chose for us, in trîckîng oneself 
out before the world in a stolen tîtle, and tiying to 
pass for what one is not. My forbears did indeed 
hold honourable employments ; I hâve won for 
myself the honour of six yeàrs' service under arms ; 
and I am rich enough to keep up a faîr rank in 
Society; but for ail that I do not choose to give 
myself a name whîch others in my place mîght think 
they could lay claim to, and I will tell you frankly 
that I am not of gentle birth. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Your hand on it, sir; my daughter is not for you. 

CLEONTE 
What? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

You are not a gentleman bom, you shall not hâve 
my daughter. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
What d* ye mean with your gentleman bom ? Are 
we of the rib of St. Louis ourselves ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Hold your tongue, wife; I see what you*re 
coming at. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Did either of us come of any but honest tradesmen ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Just listen to her, will you ! 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 93 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

And was n't your father a shopkeeper as well as 
mine ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Plague take the woman 1 she always does ît. If 
your father was a shopkeeper, so much the worse for 
hîm ; but as for mine, they 're malaperts who say so. 
Ail I hâve to say to y ou» is that I mean to hâve a 
gentleman for son-in-law. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Your daughter should hâve a husband that îs a 
proper match for her; and she 'd be better off wîth 
a good honest fellow» rich and handsome, than with 
a beggarly broken-down nobleman. 

NICOLE 
That 's so ; there *s the Squîre*s son în our village, 
who 's the greatest lout and the silliest noodle I ever 
set eyes on. 

MR. JOURDAIN, to Nicole 
Hold your prate, Mistress Impertinence. You 're 
always thrusting yourself into the conversation. I 
hâve riches enough for my daughter ; ail I need is 
honours, so I shall make her a marquise. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

A marquise ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Yes, a marquise. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Ah ! Heaven save us from that ! 



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94 Molière 

MR. JOURDAIN 
'T is a thing I am resolved on. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

*T is a thing to whîch I shall never consent. Your 
marriages with people above you are always subject 
to wretched vexations. I don't want my daughter 
to hâve a husband that can reproach her -with her 
parents, and children that will be ashamed to call 
me grandma. If she should corne to call on me in 
her fine lady's équipage, and fail'by chance to bow to 
any of the neighbours, they would be sure to say a 
hundred ill-natured things. "D'ye see/' they 'd 
say, "this marquise that gives herself such airs? 
She 's the daughter of Mr. Jourdain, and she was 
only too happy, when s|ie was little, to play at My 
Lady with us. She has n't always been so hîgh and 
mighty as ail that, and her grandfathers were both 
drapers beside St. Innocentas Gâte. They pîled up a 
good fortune for their children, which they *re pay- 
ing mighty dear for now, may be, in another world ; 
riches like that are n't got by honest practîces." I 
don't want ail this cackle, and, în a word, I want a 
man who shall be beholden to me for nny daughter, 
and to whom I can say : ** Sit down there, son-în-law, 
and hâve dinner with me." 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Those are the sentiments of a petty soûl, wîUîng 
to stay forever in a mean station. Don't talk baclc 
to me any more. My daughter shall be a marquise, 
in spite of ail the world, and if you provoke me I *11 
make her a duchess. 



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The Tradesman Tumed Gentleman 95 

SCENE XIII 

Mrs. Jourdain, Lucile, Cleonte, Nicole, Covielle 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Cléonte, don't lose heart y et. (71? Lucile) FoIIow 

me, daughter ; corne and tell your father boldly that 

if you cannot hâve hîm, you won't many anybody, 

SCENE XIV 
Cleonte, Covielle 

COVIELLE 

You Ve made fine work of ît, with your lofty 
sentiments. 

CLEONTE 
What can I do ? I hâve scruples in this matter \ 
which the example of others cannot overcome. 

COVIELLE 

What nonsense, to take things serîously with 
such a man ! Don't you see he is ofiF his head? 
Would ît hâve cost you anything to hâve accom- 
modated yourself to his chimeras ? 

CLEONTE 
You are rîght ; but I did n't suppose one had to 
brîng his proofs of nobîUty în order to become Mr. 
Jourdain 's son-in-law. 

COVIELLE, laughing 
Ha ! ha ! ha ! 

cleonte 
What are you laughing at ? 



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96 Molière 

COVIELLE 
At an îdea that has corne înto my head, to trick 
the fellow, and get you what you want. 

CLEONTB 
How? 

COVIELLE 

The îdea îs altogether comical. 

CLEONTE 

But what îs ît ? 

COVIELLE 

There was a certain masquerade performed not 
long ago, whîch fits in hère excellently, and whîch I 
mean to work înto a burlesque that I '11 play upon 
our coxcomb. The thing borders on farce ; but wîth 
hîm, we can venture anything ; we need n't be too 
particular, for he îs a man to play hts rôle în ît to a 
marvel, and swallow greedily ail the absurdities we 
take ît înto our heads to tell hîm. I hâve the actors 
and costumes ail ready ; just let me alone for ît. 

CLEONTE 

But tell me . . . 

COVIELLE 
I wîll let you know ail about ît. But let 's get 
away ; hère he îs, comîng back. 

SCENE XV 
MR. JOURDAIN, alofie 

What the devîl does ît mean ? They are always 
tauntîng me wîth my great lords, and I thînk nothîng 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 



97 



îs so fine as keepîng company wîth great lords ; there s 
nothîng but honour and cîvîlity among 'em, and I ^d 
gladly give two fingers ofif my hand, to hâve been 
born a count or a marquis. 

SCENE XVI 

Mr. Jourdain, Lackey 

LACKEY 

Sir, hère îs the Count, and a lady he 's handing în. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Eh ! bless me ! I hâve some orders to give. Tell 
them I shall be hère presently. 

SCENE XVII 
DoRiMENE, Dorante, Lackey 

LACKEY 

Master says as how he '11 be hère presently. 

DORANTE 
Very well. 

SCENE XVIII 

DoRiMENE, Dorante 

DORIMENE 

I don't know. Dorante ; I am taking stîU another 

strange step în lettîng you brîng me to a house 

where I hâve no acquaintance. 

DORANTE 
What place then, madam, would you hâve my 
love choose to entertaîn you în, sînce to avoid 



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98 Molière 

scandai you will not hâve it be either your house or 
mine? 

DORIMENE 

But you forget to say that I am letting myself be 
drawn on day by day, by receîvîng too great tokens 
of your love. In vaîn do I refuse things, you weary 
out my résistance, and you hâve a courteous obstinacy 
that gently brings me to do everythîng you wish. It 
began with fréquent visits, déclarations came next, 
and after them sérénades and entertainments» fol- 
lowed now by présents. I hâve resisted ît ail ; but 
you will not be discouraged, and step by step you get 
the better of my résolves. I can answer for nothing 
now, and think that in the end you will bring tne to 
matrimony, which was so far from my thoughts. 

DORANTE 

Faith, madam, you ought to hâve been brought 
to it already. You are a widow, and dépendent on 
no one but yourself ; I am my own master, and love 
you more than life ; what stands in the way of your 
making me completely happy to-day ? 

DORIMENE 

Dear me ! Dorante, there must be many good 
qualities on both sides for two people to live happily 
together; and the two most reasonable people in 
the world often find it hard to make a satisfactory 
match. 

DORANTE 

You are in the wrong, madam, to imagine so many 
difficulties ; the experîment you hâve made does not 
prove ansrthing for other cases. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 99 

DORIMENE 
At any rate» I corne back to this one point : the 
expense you go to for me disturbs me for two 
reasons: first, because it commits me more than I 
could wish ; and second, because I am sure, if you 
wîll allow me to say it, that you cannot do this 
without incommoding yourself; and that I would 
not hâve. 

DORANTE 

Ah ! madam, thèse things are trifles ; 't is not in 
that way . . . 

DORIMENE 

I know what I am saying ; and, for instance, the 
diamond which you hâve forced me to accept, is of 
such value . . • 

DORANTE 
Eh ! madam, I beg you, do not make so much of 
a thing which my love deems unworthy of you, and 
allow me . . . But hère îs the master of the house. 

SCENE XIX 
Mr. Jourdain, Dorimene, Dorante 

MR. JOURDAIN, after having tnade two bows, finding 
himself too near Dorimtne 
A little farther off, madam. 

DORIMENB 

What? 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Just a step, îf you please. 



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100 Molière 

DORIMENE 

What do you mean? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Fall back a lîttle, for the third one. 
DORANTE 

Madam, Mr. Jourdain knows his manners. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Madam, it is a great pride for me to see myself 
fortunate enough to be so happy as to hâve the 
felicity that you should hâve had the kindness to 
grant me the grâce of doing me the honour of hon- 
ouring me with the favour of your présence ; and îf 
I had but the worth to be worthy of such worth as 
yours, and if Heaven • • • envions of my happiness 
. • • had granted me • • • the advantage of finding 
myself worthy • • . of the . • . 

DORANTE 
That will do, Mr. Jourdain. Madam does not 
care for great compliments, and knows that you *re a 
man of wit. {Aside to Dorimène) He is a worthy 
citizen, ridiculous enough, as you see, in ail his 
behaviour. 

DORIMENE, ixside to Dorante 
T is not hard to see that. 

DORANTE 
Madam, this is my best friend. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

T is too much honour you do me 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman loi 

DORANTE 

A gallant man, every înch of hîm. 

DORIMENE 

I hâve a very great esteem for hîm. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

I have done nothing as yet, madam, to deserve 
this favour. 

DORANTE, aside to Mr. Jourdain 
Be sure you take good care not to speak to her of 
the diamond you gave her. 

MR. JOURDAIN, (zside to Dorante 
Could n't I just ask her how she likes it? 

DORANTE, aside to Mr. Jourdain 
What! On no account. It would be vulgar in 
you ; to behave gallantly you must act as if it 
were not you that had given her thîs présent. {Aloud) 
Mr. Jourdain, madam, says he is enraptured to see 
you at his house. 

DORIMENE 
He honours me greatly. 

MR. JOURDAIN, aside to Dorante 
How obliged I am to you, sir, for speaking thus 
on my account ! 

DORANTE, aside to Mr. Jourdain 
I have had the greatest diflBculty in getting her to 
corne hère. 

MR. JOURDAIN, aside to Dorante 
How can I ever thank you enough ? 



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loa Molière 

DORANTE 

Madam, he says he thinks you the most beautif ul 
woman in the world. 

DORIMENE 

T is too much favour he does me. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Madam, 't is you that do ail the favours; and . • . 

DORANTE 

Let us think of the dinner. 

SCENE XX 
Mr. Jourdain, Dorimene^ Dorante, Lackey 
LACKEY, to Mr. Jourdain 
Everything is ready, sir. 

DORANTE 

Let us go and sit down, then, and send for the 
musicians. 

SCENE XXI 
BALLET 
The six cooks who prepared the feast dance together, 
making the third interlude ; after which they bring in a 
table covered with various dishes. 



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ACT IV 

SCENE I 

Dorants, Dorimene, ^Ir. Jourdain ; Three Singsrs, 
one woman and two bfen ; l.acksy 

DORIMENE 

Why» Dorante, this is altogether a magnificent 
feast. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

You are pleased to say so ; but I could wish it 
were more worthy of your acceptance. (Ail sit down 
at table.) 

DORANTE 

Mr. Jourdain is right, madam» to speak as he does ; 

and I am grateful to him for doing the honours of 

hîs house so welL I agrée wîth hini that the repast 

is not worthy of you. Since I ordered ît, and since 

I am not so clever în thèse matters as some of our 

friends, you hâve not hère a very learned feast, and 

wiil find în ît some încongruitîes of good cheer, some 

barbarisms of taste. If our friand Damis had had a 

hand in it, everythîng would be accordîng tp the 

rules; there would be élégance and érudition at 

every point, and he would not faîl to cry up beyond 

measure, himself, ail the features of the treat he was 

gîvirig you, and compel you to admit hîs hîgh 

capacity in the science of good eating; he would 

103 



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104 Molière 

tell you of a fancy loaf baked by itself, wîth golden 
kissing crust ail the way round that cninches softly 
between your teeth ; of a wîne wîth a velvety body, 
relîeved by a tang that *s not too strong ; of a shoul- 
der of mutton garnîshed wîth parsley ; of a loin of 
Normandy meadow-veal, as long as this, white, déli- 
cate» and like real almond paste between your teeth; 
of partridges set off with a sauce of wondrous flavour; 
and, for his masterpiece, of a pearl broth, reinforced 
by a plump young turkey with little pigeons at the 
four corners, and a garnish of white onions blended 
wîth chîcory. But as for me, I must own my ignor- 
ance ; and, as Mr. Jourdain very well saîd, I could 
wish the feast were more worthy of your accept- 
ance. 

DORIMENE 

My only answer to this compliment is to eat as I 
am doing. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Ah ! what beautif ul hands you hâve ! 

DORIMENE 
The hands are nothing to boast of, Mr. Jourdain; 
you must mean the diamond, which îs very hand- 
some. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
I, madam ? Heaven forbid that I should speak of 
it ! That would not be well bred ; and the diamond 
îs a very trifle. 

DORIMENE 
You are mîghty hard to please. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 105 

MR. JOURDAIN 

You are only too kind . . . 

DORANTE, making- signs to Mr. Jourdain 
Corne, give some wîne to Mr. Jourdain, and to the 
musicians, who will do us the favour of singing a 
drinking song. 

DORIMENE 
You add a wondrous relish to good cheer by 
mingling music with it, and I find myself royally 
entertained hère. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Madam, 't is not • . • 

DORANTE 

Mr. Jourdain, let us be silent and listen to our 
musicians ; what they wîU let us hear will be much 
better than ail you and I could say. ( The singer s^ 
taking glasseSy sing two drinking songSy accompanied 
by full orchestra.) 

FIRST DRINKING SONG 

Phillis, a thimbleful, and be not loth ; 

In your fair hands a glass has wondrous charms ! 
You and the wine, you lend each othèr arms ; 
I feel my love redoubled for you both. 
To wîne, and to each other, O my faîr, 
Eternal love we *11 swear ! 

The wîne wîns added gfraces from your lîps, 

Yet leaves your lîps more lovely than before! 
Each makes me long to taste the other more, 

From both my heart intoxication sips. 



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To wîne, and to each other, O my faîr, 
Eternal love we '11 swear ! 

SECOND DRINKING SONG 

Corne drinky corne drink, dear friends ! 
Time steals our life away ; 
Let 's use ît whîle we may. 
For soon it ends. 

Once past the Stygîan shore, 

Farewell good wine and love. 
Drink now, for then *t wîU prove 
We '11 drink no more. 

Leave fools theîr reasonings fine 
On lîfe's felicity ; 
We '11 seek philosophy 
In pots of wine. 

Ail else is powerless 

To drive duU care away; 
In drinking well each day» 
Lies happiness. 

THE THREE SINGERS TOGETHER 
Quicky quick, the wine, boys, pour to everyone ! 
Pour, pour again, until we say : " Hâve done ! " 

DORIMENE 

I think 't is impossible to sing better ; that is 
altogether beautiful. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Ah ! madam, I see hère something more beautiful 
stîll. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 107 

DORIMENE 

Indeed ! Mr. Jourdain îs more of a courtier than 
I thought. 

DORANTE 

Why, madam! what do you take Mr. Jourdain 
for? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

I wish she would take me for whatever I *d name. 

DORIMENE 
Agâin? 

DORANTE, to Dorimène 
You don*t know hîm yet. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

She shall know me whenevef she wilL 

DORIMENE 
Oh II gîve up. 

DORANTE 
He 's always ready wîth hîs repartee. But you 
haven't noticed, madam» that Mr. Jourdain eats ail 
the pièces you hâve touched. 

DORIMENE 
Mr. Jourdain is a man who charms me. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

If I could charm your heart, I should be . . . 

SCENE II 
Mrs. Jourdain, Mr. Jourdain, Dorimbne, Dorante, 

MUSICIANS, Lackby 
MRS. JOURDAIN 

Oh ! oh ! I find good company hère, and I see 



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io8 Molière 

plainly that I was n't expected. So 't was for this 
pretty business, Mr. Husband, that you were so 
eager to pack me off to sister's ? I hâve just seen a 
stage downstairs, and hère I find a banquet fit for 
a wedding. That's the way you spend your sub- 
stance; and that 's how you feast the ladies in my 
absence, and give them a concert and a play while 
you send me trotting. 

DORANTE 
What do you mean, Mrs. Jourdain? And what 
sort of fancy hâve you taken înto your head, to 
think that your husband is spending his substance, 
and that 't îs he who is giving this entertainment to 
the lady. Understand, please, that *t îs I ; that he 
has merely lent me his house ; and that you ought to 
be a little more careful what you say^ 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Yes, foolish woman, 't is the Count who offers this 
treat to the lady, and she is a person of quality. 
He does me the honour to make use of my house, 
and is pleased to let me be with him. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

That 's ail stuff and nonsense. I know what I 
know. 

DORANTE 

Wear better spectacles, Mrs. Jourdain, wear bette r 
spectacles. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
I Ve no use for any kînd of spectacles, sir, I can 
see plainly enough. I Ve had a smell of this for a 



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The Tradesman Tumed Gentleman 109 

long tîme, and I tell you I am no fool. It îs shame- 
fui of you, great lord as you are, to lend a helping 
hand to my husband's follies. And for a gfreat lady 
lîke you, madam, 't îs neither handsome nor honest 
to bring dissension into a family, and to let tny 
husband make love to you. 

DORIMENE 

What does ail this mean ? Indeed, Dorante, you 
are wrong to expose me to the preposterous fancies 
of this strange woman. 

DORANTE, following Dorimène as she goes out 
Madam, oh madam ! where are you going? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Madam . . . My Lord, make my apologies to her, 
and try to bring her back. 

SCENE III 

Mrs. Jourdain, Mr. Jourdain, Lackey 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Ah! plague that you are, hère 's more of your 
fine doings ! You come and affront me before 
everybody, and drive people of quality out o£ my 
house. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

I don*t care a fig for their quality, 
MR. JOURDAIN 

I don't know what restrains me, confound you, 
from splitting your skull wîth what is left of the 
feast that you Ve come and disturbed. {The table is 
earriedûj^.) 



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MRS. JOURDAIN, going 

I snap my fingers at you. T îs my rîghts l 'm 
defending, and I shall bave ail the women on my 
side. 

MR, JOURDAIN 

You 're doing well to get out of the way of my 
(ury, 

SCENE IV 

MR. JOURDAIN 

She came in at a most unlucky moment. I was in 
the humour to say fine things; and I never felt 
so f uU of wît before. What hâve we hère ? 

SCENE V 

Mr. Jourdain ; Covielle, in disguise 

COVIELLE 

Sîr, I am not sure whether I hâve the honour to 
be known to you. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
No, sîr. 

COVIELLE, holding out his hand about a foot front the 
ground 
I saw you when you were no bigger than that. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Me? 

COVIELLE 
Yes. You were the prettîest chîld in the world, 
and ail the ladies used to take you in their aritis 
to kiss you. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman m 

MR. JOURDAIN 

To kîss me ? 

COVIELLE 
Yes. I was a great friend of your late father. 
MR. JOURDAIN 

Of my late father ? 

COVIELLE 
Yes. He was a very worthy gentleman. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
What do y ou say ? 

COVIELLE 

I say he was a very worthy gentleman. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
My father ? 

COVIELLE 

Yes. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
You knew hîm well ? 

COVIELLE 
Indeed I did. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
And you knew hîm for a gentleman ? 

COVIELLE 
Beyond doubt. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Then I don't know what to make of the world. 



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112 Molière 

COVIELLE 
Why? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

There are sQly people who insist on telling me 
that he was a shopkeepen 

COVIELLE 

He, a shopkeeper ! It is pure slander ; he never 
was. Ail he did was this : he used to be very 
obliging, very polite» and since he was a connoisseur 
in cloth, he used to go about choosing it ever)nvhere, 
and had it brought to his house» and gave it to his 
friends, for money. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

I am charmed to know you, and to hâve you bear 
witness that my father was a gentleman. 

COVIELLE 

I will maintain it to ail corners. 
MR. JOURDAIN 
I shall be obliged to you. What business brings 
you hère ? 

COVIELLE 

Since my acquaintance wîth the worthy gentle- 
man, your late father, which I told you of, I hâve 
travelled round the whole world. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
The whole world ? 

COVIELLE 
Yes. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 113 

MR. JOURDAIN 

It must be a long way to that countiy. 

COVIELLB 

Indeed ît îs. I came back from my far travels 
only four days ago ; and on account of the înterest 
I take in ail that concerns you, I hâve corne to bring 
you the best pièce of news in the world. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

What news? 

COVIELLE 

You know the son of the Grand Turk îs hère? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

I? No. 

COVIELLE 
What ! He bas an absolutely magnificent retînue ; 
people are ail flocking to see him, and he has been 
received hère as a very great lord. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

On my word, I did n*t know it. 

COVIELLE 
The point of advantage for you în ail this, îs that 
he 's in love wîth your daughter. 

MR. JOUIIDAIN 

The son of the Grand Turk ? 

COVIELLE 

Yes ; and he wants to be your son-in-law. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

My son-în-law, the son of the Grand Turk? 



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114 Molière 

COVIELLE 
The spn of the Grand Turk, your son-în-law. I 
went at once to see him, and since I understand his 
language perfectly, he conversed at length with me ; 
and af ter some other talk, he said : Acciant croc soler 
ouch allah moustaph gidelum amanahem varahini ous- 
sere carbulath ? which is to say : Hâve y ou seen a 
handsome young lady, the daughter of Mr. Jour- 
dain, a gentleman of Paris ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

The son of the Grand Turk said that of me ? 

COVIELLB 
Yes. When I told him I knew you especially 
well, and that I had seen your daughter : Ah ! said 
he, marababa sahem ! which is to say : Ah ! how 
deeply am I enamoured of her ! 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Marababa sahem means, Ah ! how deeply am I 
enamoured of her ? 

COVIELLB 
Yes. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Marry, you do well to tell me so ; for I never 
would hâve thought that marababa sahem could 
mean. Ah ! how deeply am I enamoured of her ! 
'T is an admirable language, this Turkish. 

COVIELLB 

More than you hâve any îdea of. Do you know 
what cacaracamouchen means? 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 115 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Cacaracatnouchen ? No. 

COVIEI-LE 

It means : My dear soûl. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

CMaracamouchen means, My dear seul? 
COVIELLE 

Yes. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

That is something marvellous. Cacaracamoticken^ 
My dear soûl. Who would hâve thought it? It 
quite astounds.me. 

COVIELLE 

In short, to complète my embassy, he îs coming 
to ask you for your daughter in marriage ; and that 
hîs father-în-law may be worthy of hîm, he means to 
make you matnamouchiy which is a certain dignity in 
his country. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Mamamouchi f 

COVIELLE 

Yes. Mamamouchi^ which means, in our language, 
paladin. Paladin, that is, one of those ancient . . . 
în short, a paladin. There is nothîng more noble on 
earth, and you wîll rank equal with the greatest 

lords in the world. 

f 

MR. JOURDAIN 
The son of the Grand Turk does me great honour; 
I b^ you to take me to hîm, to pay hîm my thanks. 



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COVIELLE 

What ! he is just coming hère. 
MR. JOURDAIN 

He is coming hère? 

COVIELLE 

Yes; and he is bringing everything needful for 
your installation. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
That is doing things mighty sudden. 

COVIELLE 

His love can enduré no delay. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

What troubles nie is, that my daughter is an ob- 
stinate wench, and has taken a fancy to a certain 
Cléonte, and swears she *11 never marry any one else. 

COVIELLE 
She will change her mind when she sees the son of 
the Grand Turk ; besides, the sing^lar thîng about it 
is, that the son of the Grand Turk looks like this 
Cléonte, or very nearly so. I hâve just seen him, he 
was pointed out to me. The love she bears to the 
one may easily pass to the other» and • . • But I 
hear him coming ; hère he is. 

SCENE VI 

Cleonte, disguisedds a TurkjTuKKE 'Pxo^s^bearitig his 
long tunic; Mr. Jourdain, Covielle 

CLEONTE 
Ambousahitn oqui boraf^ Giourdina salamalequi ! 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 



"7 



COVIELLE, to Mr. Jourdain 

Whîch îs to say : Mr. Jourdain, may your heart 

be ail the year round like a rose-tree in bloom. 

Thèse are polite forms of expression in hîs countiy. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

I am hîs Turkîsh Highness's most humble servant. 

COVIELLE 
Carigar camboto oustin ntoraf. 

CLEONTE 

Oustin y oc catamalequi basum base alla maran ! 

COVIELLE 
He says : May Heaven give you the strength of 
lions and the cunning of serpents. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Hîs Turkîsh Hîghness honours me too much, and 
I wish him ail manner of prosperity. 

COVIELLE 

Ossa binamen sadoc babally oracaf ouram. 

CLEONTE 
Bel'-nten. 

COVIELLE 
He says you must go wîth hîm at once to get 
ready for the ceremony, so that he may then see 
your daughter and conclude the marrîage. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Ail that în two words ? 

COVIELLE 
That îs the way wîth the Turkîsh tongue ; ît says 
much în few words. Go wîth hîm at once. 



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ii8 Molière 

SCENE VII 

COVIELLE, Uzughing 
Hoi hoi hoi Faith, 'tis altogether comical. 
What a dupe ! If he had leamt his rôle by heart, 
he could not play it better. Ha ! ha ! 

SCENE VIII 

DORANTEy COVIELLB 
COVIELLE 

I beg you, sir, to be good enough to help us hère 
with the matter we hâve in hand. 

DORANTE 

Ah ! ah ! Covîelle, Who would hâve known you ? 
What a get-up ! 

COVIELLE 

As you see. Ha! ha ! 

DORANTE 

What are you laughîng at ? 

COVIELLE 

At a thing which well deserves it, sir. 

DORANTE 
Howso? 

COVIELLB 
I *d give you as many guesses as you please, sir, 
to hit on the stratagem we are usîng with Mr. 
Jourdain, to induce him to give my master his 
daughten 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 119 

DORANTE 
I can*t guess the stratagem ; but I do guess that 
ît won*t fail o£ îts efifect, sînce you hâve ît in hand. 

COVIELLE 

l 'm aware, sîr, that you know our covey. 

DORANTE 

Tell me ail about ît. 

COVIELLE 

Step aside a little, to make room for what I see 
coming. You can see part of the business, while I 
tell you the rest. 

Thé Turkish Ceremony * for ennobling Mr. Jourdain 
is performed with dancing and music, and makes the 
fourth interlude. A Mufti, four Dervishes, six Turkish 
dancersy six Turkish musicians, and other performers on 
instruments of Turkish style, are the actors in it. 

The Mufti, together with the twelve Turks and the 
four Dervishes, invokes Mohammed, after which Mr. 
Jourdain is brought in, dressed in Turkish style, but 
without turban or sword ; and they sing to him as 
f oUows : 

THE MUFTI 

SeHsabir,^ 

Ti respondir s 
Se non sabir y 

Tazir^ tazir. 

' For tfae description of the * * Turkish Ceremony/* I havc followed 
the text of the Grands Écrivains édition, which is taken directly 
from the original édition, and is somewhat bricfer than that of 
Moland and most modem editors, 

• Up to this point, the snpposcd Turkish is eithcr of Molière's iû- 



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120 Molière 

Mi Star Mufti; 
Ti qui star tif 
Non intendir; 
Tazir, tazir. 

In the same language the Mufti asks the Turks what 
Mr. Jourdain's religion is, and they assure him that he is 
a Mohammedan. The Mufti invokes Mohammed in the 
Frankish tongue, singing as foUows: 

THE MUFTI 

Mahatnetta per Giourdina 
Mipregar sera e tnattina: 
Voler far un Paladina 
De Giourdina^ de Giourdina. 
Dar turbantay e dar scarcina^ 
Congalera e brigantina^ 
Per deffender PalesHna. 
Mahatnetta^ etc. 

The Mufti asks the Turks if Mr. Jourdain will be 
faithful in the Mohammedan religion, and sings as 
f ollows : 

vention, or borrowed from a somewhat similar scène in a play by 
Rotrou ; and not more than half a dozen syllables of it are of any 
known speech. From hère on, however, Molière uses the lingo 
sometimes known as Frankish, which is the lang^uage of traders of 
ail nations along the shores of the Mediterranean, especially in the 
Levant and on the northem coast of Africa, and which is made up of 
éléments from the Turkish, Arabie, Maltese, French, Italian, Span- 
ish, and Portuguese. This stanza means : ** If you know, answer ; 
if you do not know, be still. I am Mufti ; who are you ? You do 
not understand ; be stiU, be still." 

* ** I pray to Mohammed night and moming for Jourdain ; I will 
make a paladin of Jourdain. Give the turban, give the turban» glvc 
the sword, with a galley and brigantine, to défend Palestine." 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman wi 

THE MUFTI 
Star bon Turca Giaurdina f 

THE TURKS 

THE MUFTI, dancing and singing 
Hou la ba^ ba la chou^ ba la ba^ ba la da. 

The Turks answer with the same Une. The W^iftî 
proposes to give Mr. Jourdain the turban, and singsvas 
foUows: 

THE MUFTI 
Ti non star fur ba t 

THE TURKS 
No^ noy no* 

THE MUFTI 
Non star furfanta f 

THE TURKS 
No^ no^ no. 

THE MUFTI 

JDonar turbanta^ donar turbanta*^ 

The Turks repeat ail thîs, while giving the turban to 
Mr. Jourdain. The Mufti and the Dervishes put on 
cérémonial turbans, and the Koran is presented to the 
Mufti, who o£fers a second invocation, in concert with ail 
the other Turks. After bis invocation, he gives Mr. 
Jourdain the sword, and sings as foUows : 

» •* Is Jourdain a good Turk? "— ** Yes, by Allah." 
• " You are not a cheat ?"— *• No, no, no."—** Va^ are no impos- 
ter?'*— "No, no, no."— •• Give the turban, give the turban." 



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123 Molière 

THE MUFTI 
7ï star noHk^ e non star f^ibbola. 
PigUar schiàbbola. 

The Turks repeat the same Unes, ail with sword in 
hand, and six of them dance round Mr. Jourdain, pre- 
tending to give him many blows with the flat of their 
swords. 

The Mufti orders the Turks to cudgel Mr. Jourdain^ 
singing as follows: 

THE MUFTI 

Dara^ dara^ 
Bastonnara^ bastonnara, 
The Turks repeat the same lines, meanwhile giving 
him a cudgelling in time with the music. 

The Mufti, having had him cudgelled, sings to him : 

THE MUFTI 

Non tener honta : 
Questa star fultima affrontai 
The Turks repeat the same Unes. 
The Mufti offers still another invocation, and then 
withdraws, with ail the Turks, dancing and singing, 
accompanied by several instruments in the Turkish style. 

* •* You are noble, 't is no fable. Take the sword/* — ** Give, give, 
a cudgelling, a cudgelling.*'-»** Be not ashamed ; tHis is the last 
affront** 



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ACT V 

SCENE I 

Mrs. JouRi^AiNy Mr. Jourdain 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Heaven préserve us ! Mercy on us ! What *s ail 
thîs ? What a figure ! Are you goîng a^mumming, 
and is this carnival time ? Speak, I say, what does 
ît mean ? Who rîgged you up like that ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

The impudent woman, to speak thus to a Mama^ 
mouchi ! 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

How now ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Yes, you must show me respect now; I hâve just 
been made Mamamouchi. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

What do you mean wîth your Mamamouchi? 
MR. JOURDAIN 

Mamamouchi, I tell you. I am Mamamouchi. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

What kind of beast is tbat ? 

133 



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124 Molière 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Mamamouchi, whîch îs to say, in our language, 
paladin. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Baladin ! Are you going to dance ballets at your 
time o£ lif e ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 
What an ignoramus. I say paladin: that îs a 
dignity in which I hâve just been installed. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

HoWy installed ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Mahanutaper lordina. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
What 's that? 

MR. JOURDAIN 
lordina, which is to say Jourdain. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
Well, what o£ it, Jourdain ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Voler far un Paladina de lordina. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
How? 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Dar turbanta con galera. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
What 's he say? 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 125 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Per deffender Palestina. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
What are you drîvîng at ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 
DarUy daruy bastonnara. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
What îs ail thîs gibberîsh ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Non tener honta^ questa star V ultiffia affronta. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
What on earth îs ail that ? 

MR. JOURDAIN, singing and dancing 
Hou la ba, ba la chou, ba la ba^ ba la da. (Hefalls 
down.) 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
Alas ! Heaven help us ! My husband has gone 
mad ! 

MR. JOURDAIN, gettifig up and going off 
Peace, Mîstress Insolence. Show respect to His 
Excellency the Mamamouchî. 

MRS. JOURDAIN, aloite 
What 's become of his sensés ? I must run and 
prevent hîm from goîng eut. {Seeing Dorintène 
and Dorante) Oh ! oh ! hère 's the rest of our 
gang. I see nothîng but vexation whichever way I 
turn. 



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126 Molière 

SCENE II 
Dorants, Dorimene 

DORANTE 

Yes, madam, you shall see the most amusing thîng 
imaginable ; I don't believe *t îs possible to find in 
ail the world another man as crazy as he. Then, 
too, madam, we must try to serve Cléonte in hîs 
love-affair, and help him out with this masquerade. 
He is an honest fellow, and deserves to hâve us take 
his part. 

DORIMENE 
I esteem him highly, and know he deserves good 
fortune. 

DORANTE 

Besides which, madam, we hâve hère a ballet 
which we must n't miss ; I want to see whether my 
idea will succeed. 

DORIMENE 

Yes, I saw there were magnificent préparations 
made ; and truly, Dorante, I cannot allow thirgs to 
go on so. I must put an end to your extravagance ; 
and so, to stop ail this outlay which you lavish. on 
me, I hâve resolved to marry you at once. T îs the 
only way; for ail such things end, as you know, 
after marriage. 

DORANTE 

Ah ! madam, is it possible you hâve f ormed so 
kind a resolution in my favour ? 

DORIMENE 

T is only to keep you f rom ruining yourself ; for 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 127 

otherwise I can see very well that before long you 
would not hâve a penny left. 

DORANTE 

How deeply grateful I am to you, madam, for the 
care you take to préserve my estate ! It îs whoUy 
yours, and my heart wîth ît. You shall use them 
both at your own good pleasure. 

DORIMENE 
I shall use them both well. But hère is our fel- 
low ; and an amazing figure he is ! 

SCENE III 

Mr. Jourdain, Dorimbns, Dorants 

DORANTE 

Sir, this lady and I hâve corne to pay homage to 
your new dignîty, and congratulate you on marry- 
ing your daughter to the son o£ the Grand Turk. 

MR. JOURDAIN, after having made his salaams 
Sir, I wish you the strength of serpents and the 
cunning of lions. 

DORIMENE 

I am very glad to be among the first, sir, to corne 
and congratulate you on the height of glory to which 
you hâve risen. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Madam, may your rose-bush be în bloom ail the" 

year round. I am infinitely oblîged to you for your 

înterest în the honours that bave corne upon me ; 

and I am greatly rejoiced to see you retumed hère, 



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128 Molière 

so that I may tender to you my most humble ex- 
cuses for my wife*s fantastic behaviour. 

DORIMENE 

That is nothing ; I can excuse such an impulse in 
her; your heart must be precious to her, and *tis no 
wonder that the possession of a man like you should 
inspire some alarms. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

The possession of my heart is whoUy yours. 

DORANTE 
You see, madam, that Mr. Jourdain is not one of 
those people who are blînded by prosperity, and 
that in ail his greatness he still will own his f riends. 

DORIMENE 

That is the mark of a truly noble souL 

DORANTE 
Where is His Turkish Highness? We should 
like, as friends of yours, to pay him our respects. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Hère he comes, and I hâve sent for my daughter 
to be married to him. 

SCENE IV 

Mr. Jourdain, Dorim£N£, Dorante; Clkontb^ dressed 
as a Turk 

DORANTE, to Cléoftte 

Sir, we hâve come to pay our bornage to Your 
Highness, as friends of the gentleman your father- 
in-law, and respectfuUy to assure you of our most 
humble dévotion. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 129 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Where îs the dragoman, to tell hîm who you are 
and make hîm understand what you are saying? 
You shall see that he can answer you ; he speaks 
Turkîsh marvellous welL Hallo ! where the deuce 
has he gone? (To Cléonté) Stroufy strif^ strof^ straf. 
This gentleman is a grande segnore^ grande segnore^ 
grande segnore; and the lady îs a grande dama^ 
grande dama. {Seeing that he is not understood) 
Alack! {To Cléonte, pointing to Dorante) He be 
Mamamouchi Frenchee, and she be Mamamouchess 
Frenchee. I can*t speak any more plainly than that. 
Grood ! There *s the Interpréter. 

SCENE V 

Mr. Jourdain, Dorimene, Dorante; Cleonte, dressed 
as a Turk ; Covielle, in dtsguise 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Where are you goîng, now? We can't speak a 
word wîthout you. {Pointing to Cléonte) Just tell 
hîm that this gentleman and lady are persons of 
great qualîty who hâve come as friends o£ mine to 
pay theîr respects to hîm, and assure hîm o£ theîr 
dévotion. {To Dorimène and Dorante) You shall see 
how he '11 answer. 

COVIELLE 
Alabala crociant acci borant alabanten. 

CLEONTE 
Catalegui tubal ourin soter amalouchan. 

MR. JOURDAIN, to Dorimène and Dorante 
You see? 



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130 Molière 

COVIELLE 

He says, May the raîn of prospcrity forever water 
the garden of your family. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Did n't I tell you he could speak Turldsh ! 
DORANTE 

Admirable. 

SCENE VI 
LuciLS, Cleonte, Mr. Jourdain, Dorimens, Dorante, 

COVIELLE 
MR. JOURDAIN 

Corne, daughter; corne hère, corne and give your 
hand to the gentleman who does you the honour to 
ask for you in marriage. 

LUCILE 

Why, father, what a guy you are ! Are you acting 
a play? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

No, no, 't is no play ; 't îs a very serious matt«-, 
and the most honourable for you that heart could 
wish. (Pointing to Cléonté) Herc is the husband I 
bestow on you. 

LUCILE 

On me, father? 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Yes, on you. Corne, put your hand in his, and 
thank Heaven for your good fortune. 

LUCILE 
I don't want to be married. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 131 

MR. JOURDAIN 
I want you married, and I *m your father. 

LUCILE 
l'U do nothîng o£ the kind. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Oh! what a to^o! Corne, I tell you. Hère, your 
hand. 

LUCILE 
No, father; I hâve told you, no power can force 
me to accept any husband but Cléonte ; and I will 
sooner go to ail extremitîes than . . . {Recognising 
Cléonte) To be sure, you are my father ; I owe you 
entire obédience ; and ît îs for you to dispose of me 
according to your pleasure. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Ah ! I am charmed to see you retum so quickly 
to a sensé of your duty ; I like to hâve an obcdient 
daughter. 

SCENE VII 

Mrs. Jourdain, Cléonte, Mr. Jourdain, Lucile, 
Dorante, Dorimene, Covielle 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

How now ? What 's ail thîs ? I hear you 're set 
on marryîng your daughter to a mummer. 
MR. JOURDAIN 

Will you be still, foolish woman ? You always 
corne and thrust in your impertinence everywhere. 
*T is impossible to teach you common-sense. 



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132 Molière 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

You are the one 't is impossible to teach any sensé 
to ; you go from foUy to folly. What are you drîv- 
ing at now, and what do you mean with this crazy 
match ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

I am going to wed my daughter to the son of the 
Grand Turk. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
To the son of the Grand Turk ? 

MR. jO\3VCDAlt!i,pointing to CoviilU 
Yes. Make your compliments to him by the 
dragoman there. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

l 've no use for any dragoman ; I '11 tell him for 
myself, to his face,that he sha'n't hâve my daughter. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Will you hold your tongue, I say again ? 

DORANTE 
What ! Mrs. Jourdain, you set yourself în oppo- 
sition to an honour such as this ? You refuse His 
Turkish Highness for son-in-law ? 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Bless me, sir ! Mind your own business. 

DORANTE 

T is a great honour, and not to be refused. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
Madam, I beg you likewîse not to trouble yourself 
about what doesn't concem you. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 



^33 



DORANTE 

It îs our frîendship for you that makes us take an 
înterest în your welf are. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
I *11 get along wîthout your friendship. 

DORANTE 
Your daughter hère submîts to her father's wîshes. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

My daughter consents to marry a Turk ? 
DORANTE 

Certaînly. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Can she f orget Cléonte ? 

DORANTE 

What wîll one not do to be a great lady ? 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

l 'd strangle her wîth my own hands î£ she played 
a trîck like that. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Thîs îs too much prate. I tell you thîs marrîage 
shall be. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

And I tell you ît shall not be. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Oh ! what a to-do. 



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134 




Molière 

LUCILE 


Mother! 




MRS. JOURDAIN 


Go to, you 


Vea 


pitiful hussy. 



MR. JOURDAIN 

What, you scold her for obeying me. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
Yes. She is as much mine as yours. 

COVIELLE, to Mrs. Jourdain 
Madam ! 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
What hâve you got to say about ît ? 

COVIELLE 
One word. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
l 've no use for your word. 

COVIELLE, to Mr. Jourdain 
Sîr, if she will listen to a word in prîvate, I promise 
to make her consent to everything you wish. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

I shall not consent. 

COVIELLE 

Only listen to me. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

No. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 135 

MR. JOURDAIN, to Mrs. Jourdain 
Listen to him. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

No ; I will not listen. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
He wîll tell you . . . 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

I won't be told. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

Just lîke a woman's obstinacy ! Will it do you 
any harm to hear him ? 

COVIELLE 
Only hear me ; then you shall do as you please. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

Well! What? 

COVIELLE, aside to Mrs. Jourdain 
We Ve been making signs to you, madam, this 
hour or more. Don't you see that ail this is only 
done to humour your husband's whimsies ; that we 
are tricking him by this disguise, and that the son of 
the Grand Turk is Cléonte himself ? 

MRS. JOURDAIN, oside to CavieUe 
Oho! 

COVIELLE, iiside to Mrs. Jourdain 
And I, Covielle, am the dragoman. 



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136 Molière 

MRS. JOURDAIN, aside to Covielle 
Ah ! in that case I give in. 

COVIELLE, aside to Mrs. Jourdain 
Don't let the cat out of the bag. 

MRS. JOURDAIN, aloud 

Yes, it b ail right, I consent to the marriage. 

MR. JOURDAIN 
Ah! now everybody submîts to reason. {To Mrs. 
Jourdain) You would n't Ibten to hîm. I was sure 
he 'd explain to you about the son of the Grand Turk. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

He has explained it to me properly, and I am 
satisfied. Let us send for the notary. 

DORANTE 

Well said. And, Mrs. Jourdain, that your mind 
may be perfectly at rest, and that you may abandon 
at once ail jealousy of your husband, this lady and 
I will make use of the same notary for our marriage. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 

I give my consent to that, too. 

MR. JOURDAIN, aside to Dorante 
So, you '11 hoodwink her. 

DORANTE, aside to Mr. Jourdain 
We must needs put her ofï with this pretence. 

MR. JOURDAIN, aside 
Good, good. {Aloud) Go fetch the notary. 



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The Tradesman Turned Gentleman 137 

DORANTE 
Whîle he îs comïng, and drawîng up his writîngs 
let us see our ballet, and ofïer His Turkîsh Hîghness 
the diversion of it. 

MR. JOURDAIN 

A good îdea. Let *s take our places. 

MRS. JOURDAIN 
And Nicole ? 

MR. JOURDAIN 

I give her to the dragoman ; and my wife, to any- 
body that will hâve her. 

COVIELLE 
Sir, I thank you. {Aside) If 't is possible to find a 
madder fellow, I '11 go tell ît at Rome. 

TAe catnedy ends with the ballet which had been 
prepared. 



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IRISH FOLK PLAYS 

By 
LADY GREGORY 

First Séries. The Tragédies 
GRANIA KINGORA DERVOROILLA 

Second Séries. The Tragic Comédies 

THE GANAVANS THE WHITE GOGKADE 

THE DEUVERER 

Lady Ore^ory Ims pref erred going for her material to the tra- 
ditioiud f olk-history ratner than to the authorixed printad versions» 
and she has been able, in so doing^ to make her uays more living. 
One of thèse» Klneora. telling ot Brian Boru» who reigned in the 
year zooo. evoked such keen local iaterest that an old f armer 
travelled from the neighborhood of Kincora to see it acted in 
Dublin. 

The st<»7 of Grania* on which Lady Gref^ory bas founded one 
of thèse plays, was taken entirely from tradition. Orania was a 
beautifol voting woman and was to bave been married to Finn» the 
great leader of the Fenians; bnt before the nuurriage» she went 
away from the bridegroom with bis handsome yonna kinsman» 
Diarmoid. After many years, when Diarmnid had died (and Finn 
had a hand in bis death)» she went back to Finn and becana* bis 
queen. 

Another of Ladv Gregory's plays» The Canttvanm dealt with 
the stormy times of Queen Elizabeth» whose memory is a horror in 
Ireland second only to that of Cromwell. 

The WHltm Coekatim is founded on a tradition of King Jsmes 
having escaped from Ireland after the battle of ^e Boyne in a wine 
barrer 

The choice of folk history rather than written history giTos a 
freshness of treatment and elasticity of material which made the 
late J. M. Synge say that '< Lady Oregory's method had brought 
back the possibility of writing historié plays.'' ^ ^ ^ . 

AU thèse plays» except Granla^ which has not yet been stagad» 
hâve been rery successf utly perf ormed in Ireland. They are mtten 
m the dialect of Kiltartan, which had already become familiar to 
readers of Lady Oregory's books. 



G. P. PUTNAM'S SONS 

NEW YORK LONDON 



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Drantas of Importance 

Plays 

The Stlver Box— Joy— Striffe 
By John Galsworthy 

Anthor of " The Coontry Hoose/* etc. 
GrowB 8vo. $ 1 .3d net 

" By common consent, London has witnessed thîs week 
a play of serious importance, not approached by any other 
book or drama of the season, John Galswormy's * The 
Strife.' It is regarded not merely as a remarkable social 
document of significance, but as a création which, while of 
the most modem realism, is yet dassic in its pronounœd 
art and exalted philosophy. The play shows the types of 
the strongest men as victims of comical events and of 
weaker men. It will be produced in America, where, on 
account of its realistic treatment of the subject of labor 
union, it is sure to be a sensation." — Spécial cable dispatch 
to N. F. Times. 

The Nun of Kent d.1. 

By Grâce Denio Litchfield 

Attthor of *'BAldur the Beantiful," etc. 
GrowB 8to« $ 1 .00 net 

" In thîs drama the pure essentials of dramatîc''writîng 
are rarely blended. . . . The foundation for the stirring 
play is a pathetic épisode given in Froude's Henry VIII. . . . 

" The lines of the poem, while full of thought, are also 
characterized by f ervor and beauty. The strength of the 
play is oentred upon a few characters. ... * The Nun 
of Kent' may be described as a fasdnating dramatic 
story." — Baltimore News. 

Yzdra 

A Tratfedy tn Three Acts 

By Louis V. Ledoux 

Crown 8vo» Gloth. $1.2ABet 

•• There are both grâce and strength in this drama and 
it also possesses the movement and spirit needed for prés- 
entation upon the stage. Some of the figures used are 
striking and b^autîful, quite free from excess, and some- 
times almost austère in their restraint. The characters 
are clearly individualized and a just balance is preserved 
in the action." — The Outlook, New York. 

New York G> P> Putnam's SoflS London 

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HARVARD UNIVERSITY 

http://lib. harvard, edu 

If the item is recalled, the borrower will 
be noiifled of the need for an earlier return. 




Thankyoufor helping us to préserve our collection! 



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HARVARD œiXEGE 
UBRARY 




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